Fish Paste + Bean Curd = Presentable Seafood Tofu Dishes!

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INTRODUCTION

This is a simple dish without much history or anything to introduce. It is quite a common dish in Malaysia restaurants. It is just combining a few ingredients and make it a presentable dish to serve your house guest. It is tofu or bean curd mixed with fish paste and become “SEAFOOD TOFU”……

Tofu or bean curd is one of the most nutritious food in Asian cuisines. Not only nutritious, it is healthy.. It is made from soya beans and there are tons of soya bean based products in Asian cuisines. I am sharing this simple recipe which I hope readers will like….

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It is rather easy to buy fish paste in Singapore. Households and chefs used fish paste to make a variety of cuisines such as fish balls, meat rolls,stuffed into vegetables and etc. to make Yong tau foo.. However, in countries where this is not common, you can just follow the following simple steps to prepare your own fish paste:

  • Have some fish fillet (e.g mackerel) that have little bones or very big bones that you can take it out easily;

  • Put all the fish meat into a food processor, add some corn flour (about 200 grams of fish meat with 1 tablespoon of corn flour), some black or white pepper, some salt and other seasonings of your choice.

  • Blend until fine, scoop out and keep it in the fridge.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

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  • 2 packets of tofu (about 600 grams)

  • 1 stick of egg tofu (optional)

  • 300 grams of fish paste

  • Some seasonings to taste

  • 2 tablespoons of corn flours *

  • Adequate corn flours for coating *

  • Adequate cooking oil for deep frying *

Optional ingredients

  • 1 egg*

  • Some coriander leaves or spring onions or Chinese celery (for green colour)

  • Some red cut chilli (for red colour)

  • Some mushrooms (for black colour)

  • 2 tablespoons of rice flour for coating*

* Not in picture

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Lightly grease a 6” or 8” baking tin or dish with some cooking oil. Set aside for later use.

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  • Put all the coriander leaves and/or spring onions and/or Chinese celery, red chilli, mushroom into the food processor, and slightly blend it a few time.

  • Add in 2 tablespoons of corn flours, fish paste, egg tofu, normal tofu, seasonings of your choice (light soya sauce, white pepper, sugar, salt etc.) into the food processor.

  • Blend the ingredients until very fine and transfer to the greased baking tin. Level the mixture.

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  • Cover the top with clingy wrap. Steamed under high heat for 15-20 minutes or until the seafood tofu is set. Let it cool or if you have time, chill it in the fridge for 1-2 hours. Chilling is to make the tofu slightly harder and easier to cut and handle for later deep frying.

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  • Cut the tofu into desire size.

  • In a plastic container, put some corn flour and some rice flour in the ratio of 4:1. This basically means if you use 80 grams of corn flour, mixed with 20 grams of rice flour. You can use 100% corn flour if desired. The rice flour have the ability to keep the fritters in shape when cold but it is optional.

  • If desired, you can dust the flour with some white pepper.

  • Coat the seafood tofu with the flour mixture as evenly as possible. Be careful with the seafood tofu as it is soft and can break easily.

  • In a big pan, put about 5 cm high of oil and heat the oil using high heat. Put a wooden chopstick to assess if the rice temperature  is hot enough for frying. It is considered as hot enough if bubbles start to emit from the wooden chopstick.

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  • Fry the seafood tofu in the hot oil until the outside is crispy and golden brown. Take out the tofu, drained and put on a piece of oil absorbing paper in an airy area before transfer to the serving plate.

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  • Best served hot as one of the dishes for a Chinese meal. Suggested dip is Thailand sweet chilli sauce.


CONCLUSION

Simple dish, nothing much to conclude. Serving guests with tofu and fish cake appeared to be a disgrace to one’s household cooking.. Well, combining the two simple, cheap ingredients and put in a bit of effort to “process” it will make it become a presentable restaurant dish …. 

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Hope you like the post today and cheers. Have a nice day. 

For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE.

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This post is linked to the event, Little Thumbs up organised by Doreen from my little favourite DIY and Zoe of Bake for Happy Kids, hosted by Mich of Piece of Cake at this post.

What I cooked today (家常便饭系列)- 13-7-2013–Tomato Yimin Noodles (茄汁伊面)

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On 13 July, 2013. – Tomato noodles

Today’s dinner, i have cooked the a noodle dish which is a fusion dish between the famous Sarawak tomato noodles and Kuala Lumpur Style fried Noodles (Cantonese Yimin).

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The main difference between the two is the gravy and type of noodles.

Sarawak Tomato Noodles Cantonese Seafood Yimin
Type of noodles Fresh fine egg noodles fried in oil usually just before serving Ready made fried egg noodles in a round shape. Noodles are coarser
Gravy Tomato puree or tomato sauce with no egg added Clear gravy with beaten eggs added

Since I have nothing much to comment on what I cooked today, I have decided to have my cooking illustration in this post.

Authentic Sarawak Tomato noodles

In Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, the tomato noodles are a type of egg noodles, deep fried and soaked in a gravy made from tomato puree and sauce. The gravy is clear and orange in color.

pic courtesy : http://mile.mmu.edu.my

In Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, West Malaysia, there is another type of Cantonese noodles, called Cantonese Yi Min, a ready made deep fried noodles and soaked in a clear whitish egg gravy and cooked with seafood and meat.

pic courtesy: http://wongpenny.files.wordpress.com

The uncooked Cantonese Yimin is like the picture below and I bought it in a Singapore provision shop that sells other types of Chinese dried goods.

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WHAT IS NEEDED?

Most if not all ingredients except the noodles (Yin Min) are substitutable to your liking. Measurements is for reference and for cooking a meal of 2 adults and 2 kids.

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  • 250 grams of shrimps or/and cuttlefish
  • 250 grams of sliced pork/chicken
  • 250 grams of fish cakes cut into slices
  • 200 grams of fresh leafy vegetable such as choy sim

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  • 1 8 inches diameter fried egg noodles (Yimin) usually available in Chinatown especially Cantonese provision shops
  • 100 g of tomato ketchup;
  • 4 eggs – crack and slightly beaten
  • 50  g of corn starch/potato starch
  • 2 tablespoons of white vinegar
  • Seasonings such as salt, flavour enhancers
  • 5 cloves of garlics and shallots – chopped into small pieces
  • Pinches of salt and 1 tablespoon of sugar.

STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • In a big and dip plate, placed your noodles in the centre.
  • In a small mixing bowl, place tomato paste/puree and corn starch, add half cup of water, stir until well mix and set aside for later use. Your tomato starch solution should be orange creamy in colour. You can also add the seasonings of your choice at this point of time).

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  • In a hot frying pan, put 3 tablespoon of oil, fried the chopped garlics and shallots until golden brown or until aromatic.
  • Add the sliced meat (pork of chicken) and fried for about 1 minutes;
  • Add the sliced fish cake, cuttlefish (if any), chopped vegetable and fried for another 1 minutes;
  • Add 1.5 cups of hot water to the pan and bring to boil under high heat.

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  • Add in tomato starch solution and bring to boil.
  • Add in the prawns, beaten eggs. Pour your beaten eggs slowly into the boiling tomato gravy, use a chopstick of fork to slightly make a circular motion in the gravy such that the egg will be broken into tiny pieces in the gravy.
  • Add in vinegar, sugar, salt and any other seasonings that you like (e.g fish sauce, light soya sauce, mushrooms concentrate, pepper etc.) and bring to boil.
  • Once boiled, slowly scoop out your gravy and pour on top of the noodles. The noodles will gradually soften. You can prepare your gravy first and pour on the noodles only when you want to have your meals.

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  • Let it soak for about 5 minutes before putting it in separate plates for individual servings. This will help the noodles absorbed the gravy making the noodles tastier.
  • Serve hot in individual plate.

 

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CONCLUSION

  • This is the first time I published a cooking illustration in “What I cooked today series”. Cooking illustration that are less complicated will be published in this blog’s sister Facebook Page – Guaishushu’s Page. Please refer to this page for simple cooking illustration for daily meals.
  • This noodle is neither the famous Sarawak tomato noodles nor the famous Cantonese Yimin noodles. It is a fusion of the two. I have used the Cantonese Yimin noodles and soaked in tomato egg sauce. The end product is better than I expected. As the Cantonese Yimin noodles are coarser, they are able to absorb more gravy making the noodles tastier. The texture of the noodles are better and will not break too easily as compared to the Sarawak tomato noodles.
  • As for non-Asian readers, shall I call this Asian Style spaghettis? You will like it as the noodles are soft and smooth with tomato fragrance.

Hope you LIKE the post and let me know after you try out the dish.

Cheers and have a nice day.

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