Special Compilation Of Chinese New Year Cookies, Snacks And Cakes Recipes

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INTRODUCTION
Chinese New Year is approaching and I do not think readers needs any more recipes at this very late juncture.. However, I am curious too as to how many recipes I have for Chinese New Year snacks and cookies. I feel that it is fun to do a recap on the cookies recipes..Please click on the picture or the blue title to go to individual recipe.

Nuts Crispy Brittle or Nuts Sweets (坚果脆片)
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Cherry Blossom Stained Glass Cookies (樱花玻璃曲奇)
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Nestum Cereal Cookies (麦片饼干)
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Salted Egg Yolk Cookies (蛋黄酥饼)
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Cream Cheese Bak Kwa Savoury Cookies (肉干咸香饼干)
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Green Peas Cookies (青豆饼)
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Melting Moments
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Uppåkra (Swedish Butter Potato Starch Cookies) (瑞典马铃薯粉牛油饼干)
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Chilli Shrimp Floss Cookie
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Shrimp Floss Rolls aka Sambal Udang Kering Mini Rolls (虾米卷)
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Arrowhead Chips (香脆慈姑片,茨菇片)
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Prawn or Fish Crackers (Keropok, 炸鱼饼,炸虾饼)
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Acar Timum Sarawak – a must have for Sarawakian during Chinese New Year
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Snow White Mini Popiah Rolls
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Crispy Crabstick Snack (酥脆蟹肉小吃)
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Seaweed Fish Fillet Snack (紫菜鱼丝条)
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Nian Gao Puff (酥脆烘年糕)
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Peanut Butter Cornflake Cookies (免烤酥脆玉米片曲奇)
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Kueh Bahulu (蛋花糕)
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Pistachio and Almond Biscotti (开心果及杏仁饼干)
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Golden Cheesy Bar (黄金芝士条)
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Nan Khatai or Indian Short Bread Cookies (杏仁酥油饼)
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London Almond Cookies (伦敦杏仁饼)
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Traditional Short Bread Biscuits (英式传统牛油饼干)
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Daisy Biscuits, Biskuit Semperit, Biskuit Dahlia, 挤花饼干
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S Shape Butter Cookies (Kuih S)
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Plum Blossom Cookies (梅花饼)
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Kueh Momo or Kueh Makmur or Ghee Cookies
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Peanut Cookies (花生饼)
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Almond Biscuits – 杏仁饼干
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Chinese Walnut Crisp–Hup Toh Soh (核桃酥, 合桃酥)
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Macadamia Russian Tea Cakes
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Open Faced Pineapple Tarts (凤梨挞)
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Golf Ball Pineapple Tarts (凤梨酥)
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Traditional Kueh Bangkit
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Mung Bean Cookies or Kuih Koya (绿豆糕)
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Authentic Lapis Legit (Spekkoek 印尼千层蛋糕)
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Lapis Horlicks

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Instant Chinese Pork Jerky
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Glutinous Rice Cake, Nian Gao (年糕)
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Huat Kueh (发糕)
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Kuey Nerng Ko (鸡蛋糕)
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Radish/Turnip/Carrot/Daikon Cake (腊味萝卜糕)
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CONCLUSION

I wish to take this opportunity to wish all readers a happy Chinese New Year and may all your wishes come through.

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For these Chinese New Year related cookies, snack and steamed cake recipes, you can have a copy of Easy Chinese New Year Recipes – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD3.50. The recipes covered various recipes from auspicious radish cake to nian gao to traditional kuih bangkit to trendy London almond cookies. Of course not forgetting both type of pineapple tarts. You can purchase by clicking the link above. You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made. (While you may not used these recipe for the time being, it will be part of the collections of at least 10 E-book of Guaishushu)

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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Green Peas Cookies (青豆饼)

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INTRODUCTION

I am sorry that the post have delayed for quite a while as I was busy preparing some other cookies.. Chinese New Year is a period where cookies were served to guests and I found that there are just too many cookies being sold in the market.

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I have a bad habit of stopping by cookies store whenever I passed by. I will browse through the cookies sold and found the recipes that  I have yet to issue a post. In fact, I found that there are just too many cookies that I have never blogged even though my E-book already has more or less 25 recipes.

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One of them is this green peas cookie. I remembered many years ago when I first saw it in Singapore, I bought  one bottle and gave it to my brother as gift. He loves it but I have forgotten until I read it in  Facebook Group recently. I told myself I must give it a try..

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In this illustration, I have grind my own green peas. I have used the coated green peas which is not really advisable. If reader can get the non-coated green peas, it will be easier. If you can get hold of  ready processed green peas flour, this recipe will be a very busy recipe..

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WHAT IS REQURIED

Servings: About 60 cookies depend on size

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  • 200 grams of green pea (preferably without coating) or green pea powder
  • 150 grams of plain flour
  • 150 grams of peanut oil or other cooking oil
  • 130 grams of icing sugar
  • 50 grams of corn starch or potatoes starch
  • 1 egg yolk for egg washing

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STEPS OF PRPARATION

  • Pre-heat the oven to 170 degree Celsius.

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  • In a food processor, blend the green peas until as fine as you can. Sift the blended green peas powder to a bowl of icing sugar, corn starch and plain flour.

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  • Transfer the flour mixture back to the food processor, add the cooking oil or peanut oil gradually, blend until it forms a pliable dough. Transfer out to a lightly floured surface. Roll out flat and use some cutters to cut into smaller pieces. Gather the sides and perform the same until all the dough are divided.

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  • Take a portion, shape round and slightly press down using your finger. Egg wash the cookies using beaten egg yolk. Use some utensils (chopstick, satay stick etc.)  to create your desired pattern. Bake in the pre-heated oven of 170 degree Celsius for about 15-20 minutes or until your desired colour tone. Your cookies will be rather fragile when hot. Let it rest in the baking tray for 5-10 minutes before transfer to a rack for complete cooling. Once completely cooled, store in an air tight of container.

Note:

  • Colour of the cookies will depend on the green peas you used. Some are very green whereas some are lighter. If prefer, you can buy the ready processed green pea powder in the bakery shop.

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CONCLUSION

This cookie is rather easy to prepare if you use ready processed green pea powder.  Remember that if you are able to find green peas without coating, please use that… It is melt in the mouth if handling are light and baking time is correct. Over baking of this cookie will make it hard.

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For more Chinese New Year related cookies, snack and steamed cake recipes, you can have a copy of Easy Chinese New Year Recipes – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD3.50. The recipes covered various recipes from auspicious radish cake to nian gao to traditional kuih bangkit to trendy London almond cookies. Of course not forgetting both type of pineapple tarts. You can purchase by clicking the link above. You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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I’m submitting this post to Best Recipes for Everyone Jan & Feb 2015 Event Theme: My Homemade Cookies organized by Fion of XuanHom’s Mom and co-hosted by Victoria Bakes

 

Best_Recipes


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Cherry Blossom Stained Glass Cookies (樱花玻璃曲奇)

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INTRODUCTION

Stained glass cookie is a rather trendy bake in Asia in recent years ..The cookie is also named as “Cathedral or church window “ cookies. It  is a cookie that have a candy in the centre resembling the tinted glass windows in some old European buildings.

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Many people have baked this as last year’s Christmas cookies…. However, I have decided to push back this recipe to Chinese New Year as I believed it is a perfect cookie for this auspicious Chinese festival.

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I purposely choose one design that shaped like flowers.. Since it is spring festival, flowers will blossom signifying a new year has arrived. After consultation with members of some Facebook Groups, I have decided to name this as Cherry blossom cookies since I already have a plum blossom cookies recipe.

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Unlike other recipes in the net, this recipe is very simple.. no difficult ingredients and what you need are just 4 main ingredients: flour, sugar, butter and some hard candy. No complicated and specialized mould is required. I use my pineapple tarts mould and do an additional step of cutting of the centre. It was pretty easy actually.

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For the hard candy, it can be of any type, any brand, and any colour. For purpose of Chinese New Year, I am quite insistent that the colour has to be red… I did not go until the extent of searching in the supermarket to look for the candy that I wanted. I just went to the neighbourhood provision shop, asking for red hard candy.

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Apparently, hard candy seems to have “lose out” to soft candy. I can’t get any one and I eventually bought the Strepsil cherry flavour for this illustration. However, i am rather confident that you can get it in larger supermarkets with Fox brands or others.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: about 30 cookies depending on size of the mould

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  • 90 grams of plain flour
  • 60 grams of butter at room temperature
  • 30 grams of icing sugar
  • Some hard candy of your choice

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Pre-heat the oven to 160 degree Celsius.

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  • Cream the butter and icing sugar until light and fluffy. Add in the flour, stir until well mixed. Transfer the dough out to a lightly floured surface. Roll the dough into about 5 mm thickness.

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  • Use your preferred mould to mould the dough. Cut off the centre of the flower (I have use a simple piping nozzle).  Bake in the preheated oven of 160 degree Celsius for 10 minutes.

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  • While the cookies are baking, use something to break the hard candy. When the cookies are ready, take out, put a small amount of hard candies in the cavity at the centre of the cookies. Send back to the oven and bake for another 10 minutes. Let the cookies cooled completely in the baking tray before removing it and store in an air tight container.

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CONCLUSION

This cookie is definitely not a difficult cookie to prepare. It is rather easy and do not ask me where I get my mould.. In fact, any pineapple tarts mould will be able to give you a beautiful design. I got mine in a neighbourhood shop and have been with me for many years.  Do play around with the colour and patterns of your mould ..

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For more Chinese New Year related cookies, snack and steamed cake recipes, you can have a copy of Easy Chinese New Year Recipes – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD3.50. The recipes covered various recipes from auspicious radish cake to nian gao to traditional kuih bangkit to trendy London almond cookies. Of course not forgetting both type of pineapple tarts. You can purchase by clicking the link above. You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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I’m submitting this post to Best Recipes for Everyone Jan & Feb 2015 Event Theme: My Homemade Cookies organized by Fion of XuanHom’s Mom and co-hosted by Victoria Bakes

 

Best_Recipes

Asian “Potato” Chips–Arrowhead Chips (香脆慈姑片,茨菇片)

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INTRODUCTION

While western countries have potatoes chips, in Singapore and Malaysia, we have arrowhead chips which is as crispy and tasty. In recent years, this snack have become a very common Chinese New Year item to serve visiting house guest and commercially, it was sold at quite a steep price.

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There is actually no recipe for this snack, it is just deep frying some thinly sliced arrowhead and what I am sharing will be some pointers during the preparation of this snack.

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As this is a rather uncommon root during the year round, it will be interesting to know a bit more about arrowhead. As per Wikipedia:

“Sagittaria sagittifolia (also called arrowhead due to the shape of its leaves) is a flowering plant in the family Alismataceae, native towetlands most of Europe from Ireland and Portugal to Finland and Bulgaria, as and in Russia, Ukraine, Siberia, Turkey, China, Australia,Vietnam and the Caucasus. It is also cultivated as a food crop in some other countries. The round tuber is edible. In China, it is known as cigu (Chinese: 慈菇; pinyin: cígū; literally: “benevolent mushroom”), and its tuber is eaten particularly on the Chinese New Year. It tastes bland, with a starchy texture, similar to a potato but somewhat crunchier, even when cooked. ”(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagittaria_sagittifolia

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As per Chinese Baidu Baike, it was written that:

“茨菰 – 慈姑属(Sagittaria)淡水植物,约20种,广布全球。多年生,草本生长于浅湖、池塘溪流。叶似头,有肉质球茎,可食。花有3枚圆形花瓣北美常见种是宽叶慈姑(S. latifolia),叶箭形至禾草状,被广泛引种以扩大禽类食源。慈姑(S. sagittifolia)分布欧洲部分地区,在中国则栽培以食用其球茎。一年生植物本草纲目》说:“慈姑一株多产十二子,如慈姑之乳诸子,故以名之。燕尾,其叶之象燕尾分叉,故有此名也”。《本草纲目》称其“达肾气、健脾胃、止泻痢、化痰、润皮毛”,是无公害绿色保健食品中的上等珍品。中医认为茨菇性味甘平、生津润肺、补中益气,对劳伤、咳喘等病有独特疗效。茨菇每年处暑开始种植,元旦春节期间收获上市,为冬春补缺蔬菜种类之一,其营养价值较高,主要成份为淀粉蛋白质和多种维生素,富含铁、钙、锌、、硼等多种活性物所需的微量元素,对人体肌能有调节促进作用,具有较好的药用价值。” (Source: http://baike.baidu.com/view/1421405.htm?fromtitle=%E6%85%88%E5%A7%91&fromid=1128865&type=syn)

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From Chinese definition, it was written that this root was planted during summer and was harvested usually during winter those provide a source of vegetable during Spring festival. That possibly explains for the common consumption of this root during Chinese New Year.

I have to be frank that this is the first year I am preparing it and I am still not good at slicing using the mandolin. So pardon me for the big and small pieces of the chips..

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

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  • Some arrowhead bulbs
  • Some cooking oil for deep frying
  • Some salt for tossing.

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Peel the arrowhead bulb. Clean and slice using a mandolin or a knife with even thickness. Place the sliced arrowhead on top of some kitchen towel to absorb the moisture. However, this is optional.

  • Heat a pot of cooking oil under medium heat. The oil is considered as ready when the tip of a chopstick is placed in the hot oil, bubbles starts to come out. Put the sliced arrowheads, use a chopstick to stir the arrowheads to avoid sticking. Use low to medium heat to deep fry the chips until golden brown and there is no visible bubbles emitted from the chips. 1-2 minutes before dishing up for draining, turn the heat to high.  Drain and toss with some salt if desired. Once completely cooled, stored in an air tight container.

Notes:

  • If your chips become burnt but not crispy, your heat is too high. Only medium to low heat is needed in the earlier part such that the interior part of the arrowhead can be cooked properly and it is very important that before dishing up, the heat has to be as strong as possible to avoid oil chips.

  • If you chips are oily, it is likely that you did not turn the heat to high for the last few minutes before dishing up for draining.

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  • If your chips have brown colour rings at the outermost part, you have not peel deep enough and any skin component remain will show up dark brownish colour. In addition, arrowhead that are not fresh will also have this dark brownish colour.

  • The thickness of each chip will have to be as even as possible. Otherwise, some chips may be ready whereas some are not, some are burnt but some are soggy.
  • You can also directly peel or slice the arrowhead into the hot oil without pre-cutting in this example . If you are interested of how other are doing, you can refer to: Frying arrowhead corms chips – YouTube

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ONCLUSION

The cost of this illustration is SGD1.oo and what I get is a medium bottle of arrowhead chips that is fresh and crispy. If you are concerned about deep frying, I honestly believed that it can be deep fried using air fryer. However, it may lack the aroma of   deep drying using hot oil. As what I said earlier, I am still new in this preparation, let’s learn together to prepare this. Why not invest S$1 and find out the best way to do the snack?

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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This recipe was included in Page 50 and Page 51 of the above E-book. 

For more Chinese New Year related cookies, snack and steamed cake recipes, you can have a copy of Easy Chinese New Year Recipes – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD3.50. The recipes covered various recipes from auspicious radish cake to nian gao to traditional kuih bangkit to trendy London almond cookies. Of course not forgetting both type of pineapple tarts. You can purchase by clicking the link above. You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Almond Biscuits – 杏仁饼干

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INTRODUCTION

I have to say that I am a bit disappointed with the appearance of these almond biscuits after baking…

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The moulding imprint was still there but was not as sharp as I wanted it to be.. Well, I should have expected that most cookies will expand after cooking and imprints will be blurred..

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Do not ask me what is my cookies cutter? It is just a simple snow flake pattern and when I want to dislodge it from the mould, I use a chopstick to push it out those created this petal pattern.

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You can always used your creativity to get the pattern you want. As a word of advise, simpler pattern will create a more elegant cookie design.

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I also did not do well in taking images for this batch of cookies or biscuits. The biscuit looked much better physically then what you seen in the picture. I found the angle of taking the photo is not very satisfactory and the complex patterns overlapped each other and become a stack of cookies with odd design… Sigh

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Nothing much to write about this cookie. It is a simple cookie well liked by many especially during Chinese New Year or other festivals..  It is made of ground almond and some people do sprinkle almond nibs or almond flakes on top of the cookies. As for shape wise, it can be of any shape and feel free to choose your favourite cookies cutter.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from: Almond Biscuits

Servings: Depending on size of mould  60-80 cookies

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  • 200 grams of plain flour
  • 150 grams of butter soften at room temperature
  • 80 grams of castor sugar
  • 80 grams of ground almond or almond meal
  • 1 tablespoon of potatoes starches
  • 1 tablespoon of mung bean flour (can be substitute with potatoes starches)
  • 1 egg yolk

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the egg yolk, beat until well combined. Add the ground almond followed by sifted plain flour, potatoes starches and mung bean flour. Fold until well mixed. You can also use the standing mixer’s lowest speed to do the mixing.

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  • Transfer to a lightly floured surface, put the dough on top of a clingy wrap. Cover the dough with another clingy wrap, roll the dough until it is about 2-3 mm thick. Take out the clingy wrap on the top, use your preferred cookie cutter to cut into your desired shape. Transfer to the baking tray, egg wash the cookies and bake in the preheated oven of 160 degree Celsius for 12-15 minutes. or until golden brown. For egg washing, crack one egg yolk and mixed with 2 drops of oil and 1 tablespoon of water, stir well, sift before applying the egg glazing.

  • After the cookies were baked, let it rest in the baking tray before transferring to a cooling rack for cooling. Cooled completely before store in an air tight container.

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CONCLUSION

Quite a simple recipe to try out.. In fact there are many almond related cookies recipes and this is one of them. Rest be assured that this is a delicious light cookie and I especially like the buttery fragrance and crumbly texture of the biscuit..

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This recipe was included in Page 28 and Page 29 of the following E-book. 

For more Chinese New Year related cookies, snack and steamed cake recipes, you can have a copy of Easy Chinese New Year Recipes – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD3.50. The recipes covered various recipes from auspicious radish cake to nian gao to traditional kuih bangkit to trendy London almond cookies. Of course not forgetting both type of pineapple tarts. You can purchase by clicking the link above. You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

coverlow-final[5]

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 26 November 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

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