Stir Fried Mantou (炒馒头)

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INTRODUCTION

I believed not many members will appreciate this dish but what I am sharing is a rather traditional snack, not in this region but in China and Taiwan. It was classified as a cuisine in Chinese Henan province or 豫菜系

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It is definitely not my creation and a Google of this recipe name will yield lots of recipes. Even English website have such recipes being captured.

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I have prepared these for at 4least  times and all the family members like this snack very much.. It is aromatic, additive and easily tailored to one’s taste buds.

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If you have never eaten this before and cannot imagine the taste… Try to think that it is a Chinese style French Toast. In fact, the way of preparation is very similar except Chinese ingredients were used.. French toast is sweet flavoured by butter but this is savoury flavoured by spring onion or vegetable. Texture is the same except it was cut in cubes. Similarly, if you do not have mantou or Chinese steamed bread, normal stale bread can be used too..

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Every time I posted this in Facebook Group, there are many members who are curious about this recipe and therefore I have decided to blog this for records since I have a lot of mantou at home from my “experiment” of modifying my recipes.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: 3-4 adult servings

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  • 4-5 stale mantou or bread
  • 2 sprigs of spring onion
  • 2-3 eggs
  • 1-2 tablespoons of cooking oil

Seasonings

  • Dashes of white pepper
  • Pinches of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of light soya sauce or fish sauce
  • Sugar to taste

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Chop the onion and cut the mantou or bread in small cubes of about 1 cm x 1 cm x 1 cm. Set aside.

  • Crack 2-3 eggs, beat well and add the cut mantou. Coat the mantou fully with eggs.

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  • In a stir frying pan, put some cooking oil, sauté the white part of spring onion until fragrant. Add the egg coated mantou, use medium heat to pan fry the mantou until the eggs are set and turn golden brown. Add dashes of white pepper, chopped spring onion,  pinches of salt, sugar to taste and the fish sauce or light soya sauce. Stir fry until well combined. Served hot as a snack.

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Note:

  • Capsicum , carrot cubes can be added to enhance flavour. Other spices such as fennel powder can be used too. If preferred, minced meat can be added.

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CONCLUSION

Preparation is easy, ingredients are simple but taste is great.. Don’t doubt, do give it a try and let me know if it suits your taste buds. Remember that you can always used stale bread for the snack..

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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food bloggers[4]

Food paradize[8]

pinterest[4]

  • If you are a Pinterest user and you are interested to have more recipes, you can join or follow this Pinterest Board set up by me  where there are more than 2600 recipes worldwide and pinned by various bloggers: FOOD BLOGGERS AND FOODIES UNITED PINTEREST BOARD.
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Stove Top Pizza or Skillet Pizza (煎锅比萨饼)

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INTRODUCTION

When I saw this video in Facebook from www.chefstoolbox.com above stove top pizza, I immediately have the urge to try preparing it. …It looks extremely easy and tasty and if you are interested to view the video in full, you can refer to the following link: https://www.facebook.com/TheChefsToolbox/videos/458019277713166/

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Today, I tried out the recipe and in general, I am satisfied with the recipe. It is fast and easy to prepare .. There is nothing much to complain about except the pizza base is not as fluffy as the recipes that require kneading and proofing..

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It took me only about half an hour to prepare this and I would think that my pizza base will be much better if my homemade pizza sauce are not as wet as the store bought.

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Though not as fluffy, the effect is not obvious at all. This is a 9” pizza and with so little flour, the base is very thin. Some part are rather crispy but some part is a bit dense.. Having said that, I would think this is a fun adventure and I will definitely be re=preparing it when there is a sudden urge for pizza. Well, the kids and me have finished all within minutes..

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from:  https://www.facebook.com/TheChefsToolbox/videos/458019277713166/

Servings: Prepare a 8”-9” pizza

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  • 62.5 grams (1/2 cup) of self raising flour
  • 62.5 grams (1/2 cup) of plain flour
  • 177 grams of ml (2/3 cup) of lukewarm water
  • 1 teaspoon of instant yeast
  • Pinches of salt
  • Pizza topping of your choice*

*For this illustration, I have used mozzarella cheeses, mushrooms, canned pineapples, tomatoes and pasta tomato sauce.

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Put all the pizza base ingredients on a non stick skillet. Stir until well combined, spread as evenly as possible . Add your pasta sauces followed by your desired toppings.

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  • Add the cheeses and place the lids on top of the skillet. Cook the pizza under medium to high heat for 15 minutes.

Note:

  • Original recipe called for 5 minutes with the vent in the lid off and another 10 minutes with the vent on.. As my skillet do not have such a function, therefore, I have let the vent on throughout the entire preparation.

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CONCLUSION

I will not say that this is the best pizza, weighing against  the amount of effort spend in the preparation, I personally think that this is a fast and easy pizza recipe worth trying, As the base is very thin, whether or not it is fluffy is of secondary importance, you will not feel it especially you have a huge amount of toppings.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day

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Singapore Stir Fry Flat Rice Noodles or Char Kway Tiao (炒粿条面)

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INTRODUCTION

My noodles series will not be complete without the common fried flat rice noodles or char kway tiao.. I believed all household will have its own recipe of fried kway tiao and what I am sharing today is the Singapore hawker centre version. I can’t claim that this is authentic but taste is close and in fact, variations are many too…

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I have argued with wife about one of the main ingredients, cockles. I said that it is a must have ingredients but my wife said it is not necessary the case nowadays. Many stores have not used cockles due to the current health concern of associating Hepatitis A with the consumption of cockles. I have wanted to add this for this illustration but I cannot get hold of it in the market. Wife further convinced me not to put this as kids will not appreciate this seafood. Therefore, I will leave it for reader to decide whether or not it is a must to have cockles for this noodle dish.

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Though the name is char kway tiao, in Singapore hawker centre, it is rather standard that it also comes with yellow noodles. Don’t ask me why, it seems that it is a standard. I have ever requested many times to different hawkers that I wanted only kway tiao, the hawker always rejected my request… I am  always puzzled that why they need to insist in this type of combination. Is it not the way of stir frying this dish the same?

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I came from Sarawak and our Char kway tiao do not really have any standard, but it is very much drier than Singapore and West Malaysia version. Here in Singapore, it is very “moist” and at time it is hard to eat with a pair of chopstick. I do not know if the “moistness” was from lots of oil used or they have added some water or too much eggs.. For this recipe, I have added 1-2 tablespoons of chicken stock it to make it moister like those sold in the hawker centre.

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Unsure if the hawker centre still uses lard but traditionally, almost all the noodle dishes uses lard to enhance its fragrance. For purposes of this illustration, I have  purposely prepared some lard and lard cubes to go with the dish. If you are interested in how to prepare lard cubes, you can refer to this post: Teochew Mee Pok And Fish Ball Noodles (潮州肉脞面 ,潮州鱼圆面)

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: 4-5 adult servings

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  • 250 grams of flat rice noodles or kway tiao
  • 150 grams of yellow noodles
  • 100 grams of fresh prawns
  • 50 grams of cockles (optional)
  • 50 grams of fish cake, sliced thinly
  • 3 Chinese sausages, sliced thinly
  • Handful of bean sprouts
  • Some Cai xin or Chinese garlic chives
  • 2 tablespoons of lard cubes (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon of minced garlic
  • 3-4 tablespoons of lard of cooking oil
  • 3-4 eggs

Seasonings

  • 5 tablespoons of light soya sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of oyster sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of sweet caramelized sticky dark soya sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of chicken stock or plain water
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar
  • Dashes of white pepper

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Mix all the seasoning ingredients, stir until well mixed and set aside. The pre-mixing is optional if you are experienced enough to pour the sauces directly to the hot wok. Seasoning is very subjective and depends on individual taste buds. Feel free to add and minus the seasoning but the ratio shall be like the above suggested. To play safe, you can add these sauces gradually during the process of stir frying.

  • In a wok with the cooking oil and lard, sauté the minced garlic over high heat until slightly brownish. Add the fish cakes and prawns and stir fry for about 1 minute. Add the kway tiao and yellow noodles, followed by chives or cai xin stir fry until well mixed.

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  • Push the char kway tiao to one side of the wok, had a bit more oil, crack the eggs and make it resemble scrambled egg and cook  until the egg is half set (still a bit runny but colour turns whitish). Stir until well mixed. Add the pre-mixed sauces, dashes of white pepper, beansprouts, sliced Chinese sausage. Stir fry until well mixed. Best served hot as a noodle dish.

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Notes

  • In general, no water shall be used for stir frying kway tiao or noodles. But it your noodles are too dry, feel free to add 1-2 tablespoons of water to facilitate the stir frying.

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CONCLUSION

Home prepared hawker noodle dishes is not difficult. However, at time, the taste cannot be compared with what the hawker have prepared because of the kitchen gadgets and they are preparing in big scales. Now matter how big is our heat in home stoves, it will not be able to compared those big stoves used by the hawkers. Do prepare to let go certain expectations but it will definitely brings a sense of achievement to be able to prepare these dishes at home.

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This recipe was included in Page 41-42 of the “One Pot Noodle E-book”. For more One Pot Noodle Dishes, you can have a copy of Easy One Pot Noodles  – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD5.00. The recipes covered various recipes from curry laksa, prawn noodles to fish head beehoon and etc. Of course not forgetting the well like Economy Bee hoon and Mee Rebus . You can purchase by clicking the link above.You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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Wanton noodles (云吞面)

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INTRODUCTION

I still remember when I was studying in my home town Sarawak, one of my teachers from West Malaysia used the following sentence to describe the differences between East Malaysian and West Malaysian dry noodles: “ East Malaysia Kolo noodles is very dry and whitish in colour where as West Malaysia wanton noodles is dark coloured noodles swimming in a black pool of sauces.” 

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In fact there are many differences between Sarawak dry style noodles and West Malaysian/Singapore kolo noodles. Among them are the types of noodles, the sauces and the garnishes. You can have a more thorough understanding of this uniquely Sarawak Kolo Noodles in this post: A Noodle Dish That Chinese Sarawakian Would Not Be Able To Let Go… Sarawak Kolo Mee

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Being raised in Sarawak, I have limited exposure of wanton noodles. In fact, it take me quite a while after studying in Kuala Lumpur to get used to the alkaline water dark yellowish wanton noodles. I believed most Sarawakian would have this similar problem  at least for quite a while too. However, I have started to like this noodle after that short period since I have no assess to Sarawak Kolo Noodles.

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In between West Malaysian and Singapore wanton noodles, there are still slight differences on the garnishes and the colour of seasonings. Most West Malaysian wanton noodles required caramelized dark soya sauce which darkens the noodles but gives a tint of sweetness, Singapore wanton noodles basically omitted the caramelized dark soya sauces.

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Though wanton noodles usually accompanied by barbecue pork, however, there are many items that was served together and this will depend on stores. Some have wanton and other served with soya sauce chicken.

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For this illustration, I have purposely prepare a soya sauce chicken to go along with the noodles. If you are interested, you can refer to this post: Cantonese Soya Sauce Chicken (粤式豉油鸡, 酱油鸡)

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As per Wikipedia,

“Wonton noodles [Mandarin: Yun-tun mian; Cantonese: Wan-tan Min], sometimes called wanton mee (“wanton” is a Cantonese word for dumpling while noodles in Hokkien is “mee” or in Cantonese, “min”) is a Cantonese noodle dish which is popular in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. The dish is usually served in a hot broth, garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings.  Malaysia offers different versions of the dish, with different states having different versions of the dish and there are versions from Johor, Pahang, Perak, Penang, Sarawak, and Selangor. The Malaysian version differs from the original in having slices of char siu added to the dish, as well as the possibility of the soup and wontons in a separate bowl, the noodles being served relatively dry and dressed with oyster sauce. Some stalls include deep-fried wontons in the dry versions as well. Singapore wonton noodles includes noodles, leafy vegetables (preferably cai-xin), barbecued pork (char siu) and bite-sized dumplings or wonton. It is either served dry or in soup form with the former being more popular. If served dry, the wontons will be served in a separate bowl of soup. Shui jiao or prawn dumplings are served at some stalls and the original Hong Kong version is available at Cantonese restaurants and noodle joints. Fried wontons (wontons deep fried in oil) are sometimes served instead of those boiled in the soup.” (Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonton_noodles)

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: 3-4 adult serving

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  • 2 drumsticks of soya sauce chicken or about 100 grams of sliced char siu
  • 8 ready made wanton (optional)
  • Chilli sauce or green preserved chilli of your choice
  • 1 bundle of leafy vegetable greens such as cai xin
  • 4 balls of fresh wanton noodles

For each ball/plate of wanton noodles:

  • 2 tablespoons of shallot or spring onion oil
  • 1 tablespoon of caramerlize dark soya sauce
  • 1/2 tablespoon of oyster sauce
  • 1/2 tablespoon of light soya sauces

Note:

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Get ready a big bowl, put in all the sauce ingredients. Stir until well mixed.

  • In a pot of hot boiling water, blanch one ball of noodles for 2-3 minutes. If it comes with a packaging instruction, follow the instruction as every noodle may have different blanching time. If you want the noodles to be more springy, dip the hot noodles in pot of icy cold water for 1 minute and drain. Transfer the noodles to the bowl with the sauces. Quickly stir until well mixed.

  • Blanch all ingredients such as wanton, vegetables using the same pot of hot water, drain and set aside.

  • For assembly, transfer the noodle to a plate, top with vegetables greens, soya sauce chicken or char siu, wanton and preserved green cut chilli or chilli sauce. Best served immediately after it was prepared.

  • For Singapore version of lighter wanton noodles, omit the dark caramel soya sauce in the sauce ingredients.

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CONCLUSION

Be it lighter Singaporean version or Malaysian darker and sweeter version of wanton noodles, all are delicious. I am rather easy when it comes to this.  For noodle recipes, the ingredients quantity are estimations. You can add whatever you like such as fish balls, meat balls, beansprouts and etc. What is important is the sauce recipe. Even that, it also depends on individual taste bud. Lastly, remember that if you want QQ springy noodles, after blanching, dip in cold water to let the cooked noodles contract and become more springy.

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This recipe was included in Page 63-64 of the “One Pot Noodle E-book”. For more One Pot Noodle Dishes, you can have a copy of Easy One Pot Noodles  – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD5.00. The recipes covered various recipes from curry laksa, prawn noodles to fish head beehoon and etc. Of course not forgetting the well like Economy Bee hoon and Mee Rebus . You can purchase by clicking the link above.You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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Shredded Chicken Braised E-Fu Noodles (鸡丝韭黄伊府面)

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INTRODUCTION

I am happy to have found this set of images that I have taken in December 2014.. I thought it was corrupted . Then, I was busy preparing new year cookies until I totally forgot about this recipe.

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This is another dish that was requested by my wife. Every time when we went for wedding reception, she will mumble and say why we never cook this dish at home… This noodle dish has never been appeared in our noodle menu possibly because both of us are not Cantonese. But like many other families, we shall be all  very familiar with the dish because the noodle dish was usually served as the last hot dish in a wedding reception.

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I swore I never buy this special Cantonese noodles if I am not preparing it  for this illustration. But I think I will continue to buy the noodle after my first attempt of preparing this. As per Wikipedia:

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“Yi mein (also called e-fu noodles, yee-fu noodles, yi noodles, or yifu noodles) is a variety of flat Cantonese egg noodles made from wheat flour. They are known for their golden yellow color and chewy characteristics. The slightly chewy and slightly spongy texture of the noodles is due to the soda water used in making the dough (as opposed to regular non-carbonated water), which was then fried and dried into flat patty-like dried bricks. The noodles may be cooked a number of ways. They are boiled first, then can be stir fried, or used in soups or salads. Good noodles maintain their elasticity, allowing the noodles to stretch and remain chewy.”  (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yi_mein)

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In Cantonese preparation, there is another rather unique ingredient that I seldom cooked. This vegetable is usually cooked together with E-Fu noodles and it is called yellow Chinese chives (韭黄)。It is the normal green garlic chives that were planted in dark, avoiding this vegetable to have direct contact with sunlight and hence produce chlorophyll.  In www.foodmayhem.com , it was written that:

“They are the same plant as garlic chives, only grown without direct sunlight, which prevents them from turning green. Garlic chives and yellow chives are more pungent than American chives with a distinct garlicky flavour. They have flat (not hollow) leaves, and are used as a vegetable in Chinese cooking as opposed to the sprinkling use of herbs. It seems that some people love them and some people find them too stinky (in a garlicky way).” (Source: http://www.foodmayhem.com/2009/05/pork-bean-curd-and-yellow-chives.html,)

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: 4-6 adult servings

Recipe adapted from: Braised E-Fu Noodles with Straw Mushrooms | Hong Kong …

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  • 500 grams of chicken breast
  • 300 grams of e-fu noodles
  • 200 grams of yellow chives , cut into 2-3 cm length
  • one packet of straw mushrooms

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  • 3 dried shitake mushrooms , soaked and cut into pieces)
  • 1 tablespoon of minced garlics
  • 2 tablespoons of oyster sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of light soya sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of cooking oil
  • 1 tablespoon of corn starch (mix with 2 tablespoons of water) – optional
  • 1/2 tablespoon of sesame oil
  • Sugar to taste
  • Dashes of white pepper
  • Pinches of salt

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • In a pot with adequate water to cover the chicken breast, bring to boil. Cut the chicken breast into small pieces. Add the chicken breast and poach the chicken until cooked. Drain and set aside the chicken stock. When the chicken is cooled, use hand to shred the chicken until floss like. You can also use a fork to assist in the shredding.

  • In another pot, put some water and 1 tablespoon of cooking oil. Bring to boil. Add the E-fu noodles. Blanch the noodles until soft which took about 5 minutes. Drain and set aside. It is best that you read the cooking instruction in the plastic packaging. Every brand will have different cooking time.

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  • In a wok, sauté the garlic and mushrooms until fragrant and slight brownish, add the yellow chives followed by straw mushrooms. Stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add about 2-3 cups of chicken stock from cooking the chicken breast  (estimation) and bring to boil. Add all the seasonings (oyster sauce, light soya sauce, sugar, salt, white pepper and sesame oil). 

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  • Add the starch solution followed by the blanched E-fu noodles. Stir until well mixed and let it simmer for about 5 minutes. If it is too dry, add more water just enough to cover the noodles. Off the heat and let it rest in the wok for at least 5-10 minutes before dishing up. Flavour will continue to develop during this 5-10 minutes.. Topped with shredded chicken before serving.

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CONCLUSION

The colour of the noodles will very much depends on the noodles you bought. Some looks very pale  yellowish whereas some looks darker brown. I loved my noodles to be a bit soupy and starchy if you prefer drier, add less water and omit the starch… The whole family like this adventure and finished off the noodles in seconds.

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This recipe was included in Page 45-47 of the “One Pot Noodle E-book”. For more One Pot Noodle Dishes, you can have a copy of Easy One Pot Noodles  – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD5.00. The recipes covered various recipes from curry laksa, prawn noodles to fish head beehoon and etc. Of course not forgetting the well like Economy Bee hoon and Mee Rebus . You can purchase by clicking the link above.You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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Penang Assam Laksa (亚参叻沙)

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INTRODUCTION

I have been holding on the preparation of Assam laksa because of 3 herbs and 2 of which create the distinctive flavour as compared to other laksa. These three herbs are laksa leaves (daun kesom) , torch ginger (bunga kantan) and normal mint leaves. Usually, the supermarket are selling a bundle or a package and other than this recipe, I have no idea what to use for the leftover laksa leaves and torch ginger.

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After blogging so many one pot noodle dishes, I have no other reasons to further delay the sharing of this famous Assam laksa.

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If you look at the definition of laksa in Wikipedia, one will know that laksa basically belong to 2 broad categories – tamarind based as in Assam laksa or coconut milk based laksa as in curry laksa. The third category is the Sarawak laksa which is both tamarind and coconut milk based laksa..If you are interested in learning Sarawak laksa you can refer to this post: Hi, Let Start Cooking the Laksa …. An In Depth Analysis and Pictorial Procedural Description Of The Famous Sarawak Laksa (Part III)

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If you are interested in the curry based laksa, you can refer to this post: Another Hawker Centre Noodle Dish–Curry Laksa or Curry Mee (咖喱叻沙, 咖喱面)

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This post is to detail the recipe of Assam laksa. Assam is tamarind in Malay and as the name suggest, the noodle dish is slightly tangy and balanced by the sweetness from the fish broth. Unlike the curry laksa of which the broth is mainly prepared from chicken stock, Assam laksa’s tasty broth is prepared from fish.. Besides tamarind, assam laksa will not be much difference from other laksa if not because of the following 2 special herbs. One of them is the bunga kantan or ginger torch  or Etlingera elatior as follows. If you are interested to read more about this aromatic flower, you can refer to : Etlingera elatior – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia .

Another special herb for this laksa is what is called laksa leaves or daun kesum. Per Wikipedia, it was written that :

Persicaria odorata, the Vietnamese coriander, is a herb whose leaves are used in Southeast Asian cooking. Other English names for the herb include Vietnamese mint, Vietnamese cilantro, Cambodian mint, hot mint, and laksa leaf.In Singapore and Malaysia, the shredded leaf is an essential ingredient of laksa, a spicy noodle soup, so much so that the Malay namedaun laksa means “laksa leaf.”

Since Wikipedia have a very detailed description of Assam laksa, I am rather reluctant to rephrase the well written description of this unique laksa dish. As per Wikipedia,

“Asam laksa is a sour, fish-based soup. It is listed at number 7 on World’s 50 most delicious foods complied by CNN Go in 2011. Asam is the Malay word for anything that makes a dish sour (e.g. tamarind or kokum). Laksa typically uses asam keping, known as kokum in the English speaking world), which is a type of dried slices of sour mangosteens. The modern Malay spelling is asam, though the spelling assam is still frequently used. The main ingredients for asam laksa include shredded fish, normally kembung fish or mackerel, and finely sliced vegetables including cucumber, onions, red chillies, pineapple, lettuce, common mint, “daun kesum” (Vietnamese mint or laksa mint) and pink bunga kantan (torch ginger). Asam laksa is normally served with either thick rice noodles or thin rice noodles (vermicelli). And topped off with “petis udang” or “hae ko” (蝦羔), a thick sweet prawn/shrimp paste.”

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Though I seldom ordered Assam laksa when I dined out, but it is my wife’s favourite dish as she was educated in the Penang, Malaysia where the state is famous forits Assam laksa…

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The outcome of this adventure is very satisfactory.. I have asked my wife to taste and give objectives comments to the dish as I am afraid that I will be prejudiced.. Asking her if there is anything wrong, her comments was “good”..otherwise, she would not have finished two bowls for dinner.. But I am very happy that my kids who are never exposed to this dish also like the noodle dish.. Of course minus all the garnishes that kids will not like at their age such as big onions, calamansi etc.. Eventually, they only ate the noodles with the gravy and some cucumber.. Haha.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from: Family Recipe for Asam Laksa – Season with Spice

Servings: 4-6 adult servings

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Spice paste (rempah)

  • 6 shallots
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 5 cm of fresh turmeric
  • 3 cm of galangal
  • 3 stalks of lemon grass
  • 10 dried chillies , soaked
  • 2 red chillies
  • 1/2 bud of bunga kantan
  • 2 tablespoons of shrimp paste (belachan)

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  • 5-6 mackerel (Ikan kembong)
  • 4-5 stalks of Vietnamese mint (daun kesum)
  • 2 tablespoons of tamarind paste
  • 3 pieces of tamarind peel (Assam keping)
  • 12-15 cups of plain water
  • Pinches of salt
  • 2 tablespoons of white sugar

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Assembly and garnishing

  • 500 grams of laksa noodles or thick rice vermicelli , blanched
  • 1 small pineapple , cut into small pieces
  • 1 red big onion – sliced thinly
  • a handful of mint leaves
  • 1 cucumber , julienned into small stripes
  • 1 red chilli  or 2-3 bird eye chillies, cut into small pieces
  • 5 tablespoons of Heko (Sweetened thick shrimp sauce)
  • 3 calamansi, cut into half
  • Some lettuces , sliced thinly
  • half a bunga kantan, sliced thinly

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Put all spice mix or rempah ingredients in a blender. Add adequate water to cover the herbs. Blend as fine as possible. Set aside.

  • Put the tamarind paste in a bowl, add 1-2 cups of water, use the hand to squeeze the tamarind paste in the water until all the seeds comes out. Drain the Assam juices and sift them onto another bowl. Throw away the seeds and set aside.

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  • Put the water in a pot. Bring to boil. Once it boils, add the fishes. Boil the fish until cooked which took about 10 minutes.  Off the heat. Take out the fish and keep the fish stock. Debone the fish.

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  • Put the spice mix into the fish stalk followed by tamarind juice, daun kesom and fish meat. Bring to boil. Once it boils, lower the heat to medium and let it simmer for about 20-30 minutes. Add the salt and sugar. Off the heat.

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  • For assembly, have a bowl. Placed some laksa noodles. Pour some soup until it covers the noodles. Garnish with mint leaves, pineapple slices, red chilli, shredded cucumber, sliced red onions, lettuces, bunga kanatan, calamansi and drizzle with the thick shrimp sauce (Heko). Best served warm as a one dish noodle meal.

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CONCLUSION

This is a rather long post. I am happy that my family have finished it all. If these pictures entice your appetite, why not give it a try? Remember that this is a savoury dish, do feel free to adjust to the one that used to eat locally. How about adding a hard boiled egg? 

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This recipe was included in Page 1-3 of the “One Pot Noodle E-book”. For more One Pot Noodle Dishes, you can have a copy of Easy One Pot Noodles  – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD5.00. The recipes covered various recipes from curry laksa, prawn noodles to fish head beehoon and etc. Of course not forgetting the well like Economy Bee hoon and Mee Rebus . You can purchase by clicking the link above.You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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Simplicity Is The Best–Teochew Kailan Cai Poh Fried Kway Tiao (潮汕芥蓝菜脯炒粿条)

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INTRODUCTION

Whenever we dined at Teochew restaurants, my wife would ordered this dish and whenever she ordered this dish, she would grumbled why we never cooked this noodle dish at home..Since I have the ingredients, I have decided to prepare this dish for lunch today.

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This is a humble dish using 3 less common cooking ingredients for noodle dishes but well liked by the Teochew dialect group.. These are preserved radish (cai poh 菜脯), kailan or Chinese kale (芥蓝)and fish sauce. (鱼露). The taste of these combo with flat rice noodles , kway tiao (粿条)is awesome. I especially love the tiny bits of preserved radish that goes well with the bland and rather tasteless flat rice noodles。。

If you are staying overseas and interested in some homemade 粿条, you can refer to this post: Homemade Chinese Rice Noodles–Hor Fun or He Fen or Guo Tiao (沙河粉,河粉或粿条). You can also refer to the post on more about the background of this flat rice noodles.

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In my humble opinion, this recipe actually comprises of 2 traditional recipes, beef kailan kway tiao (牛肉芥蓝炒粿条)and preserved radish (cai poh) stir fried kway tiao (菜脯炒粿条). The beef kailan kway tiao is more common in restaurant and usually some starches are added to smoothen the fried kway tiao. Preserved radish stir fried kway tiao is more common in household cooking. It can be a vegetarian dish and can be as simple as stir frying using 2 ingredients (cai poh and kway tiao) without the use of garlics and fish sauce…

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For this recipe, I have added some minced meat in the dish for the sake of my  growing  and this is totally optional. What I am sharing is a slightly healthier method of preparation without the use of lard and much less oil.. Of course, taste will be better using traditional method of stir frying using lard and MSG.  So keep in mind that this recipe is a recipe designed to suit current health trends. Don’t be surprised by the non traditional cooking method.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: 3-4 adult servings

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  • 400 grams of flat rice noodles or kway tiao
  • 200 grams of kailan, clean and cut into small pieces
  • 200 grams of minced meat (optional)
  • 2-3 tablespoons of preserved radish or caipo
  • 2 tablespoons of fish sauce
  • Dashes of white pepper
  • Pinches of salt (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons of cooking oil

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Put some water in the pot, put pinches of salt and few drops of cooking oil. Bring to boil and blanch the kailan until soft. Drain and set aside. The main purpose of this step is to pre-cook the vegetable and is optional.  You can add the raw kailan during the noodle stir frying stage but it will be easily become under cooked or over cooked and the colour will be less attractive.

  • In a wok, put the cooking oil, sauté the preserved radish , minced garlic using high heat until fragrant and slight brownish. Add the minced meat (optional) and stir fry until the meat is semi cooked (about 2-3 minutes).

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  • Add the kway tiao and stir fry until well mixed. Use a chop stick to stir the kway tiao if it is difficult to stir fry. Add in the blanched vegetables, followed by fish sauce, dashes of white pepper, stir fry until well combined and dish up.

Note:

  • If you buy store  kway tiao that keep in the chiller, it can be rather hard and there may be a tendency to break. It is advisable that you either water blanch the kway tiao or microwave for 1-2 minutes until the kway tiao is softened before stir frying.

  • You will need to use high heat throughout the stir frying for better tasting cooked rice noodles.

  • You can use a mix of sweet and salty preserved radish for the dish. If you are using 100% salted radish, you have to be careful in adding the salt as both fish sauce and preserved radish are salty.

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CONCLUSION

Though simple but this noodle dish is very tasty and aromatic. I hoped that readers from other dialect groups do give it a try..Feel free to add more ingredients such as prawns, fish cakes, meat slices and etc. to suit your family taste buds, but as a respect to traditional Teochew cuisine, please do not omit kailan, cai poh and fish sauce from the recipe…If you are still doubtful about the combination, order a plate of this noodle dish when you next frequent a Teochew restaurant.

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This recipe was included in Page 43-44 of the “One Pot Noodle E-book”. For more One Pot Noodle Dishes, you can have a copy of Easy One Pot Noodles  – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD5.00. The recipes covered various recipes from curry laksa, prawn noodles to fish head beehoon and etc. Of course not forgetting the well like Economy Bee hoon and Mee Rebus . You can purchase by clicking the link above.You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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My Mum Fried White Bee Hoon (妈妈炒白米粉)

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INTRODUCTION

I learned the term “Fried White Bee hoon” or rice vermicelli when I started blogging and posted my food pictures in Facebook Groups.. I am grumbling, is it not most fried bee hoon are white? At least my late mum’s version and my mother in law’s version of fried bee hoon are all white in colour.. In fact, we seldom or never use soya sauce to fry the bee hoon.

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I take the courage of asking them why are they so “scared” of frying white bee Hoon? They told me that they were amazed by the fact  that why white bee hoon is white and can be tasty as well… I think what they meant is why fried bee hoon without soya sauce or oyster sauce can be tasty? Well, since both soya sauce and oyster sauce are all flavouring agent, using white coloured flavouring agent will give you tasty white bee hoon..

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White flavouring agent can be anything that you are using now.. Like what I am using, mushroom concentrate granules, chicken stocks cubes etc.. Others like vegetable stocks cubes and the most commonly found in the olden days will be MSG… Is it not all these are white or light coloured and make a dish tasty?

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Bee hoon can be rather bland.. and to get tasty bee hoon , you just need to soak the bee hoon in meat stock.. “Soak” is the word and not really “stir fry”. Stir fry too vigorously will break your bee hoon and there are members complained that it is a disaster to fry bee hoon as the broken bee hoon spilled all over the place. If you soaked your bee hoon in meat stock, it will not break unless it was soaked for too long.

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This recipe is my family recipe. I have eaten this way of fried bee hoon since young. After I get married and when my mum passed away, I have taught my wife to cook as such. She loved it too and since than, it become the fried bee hoon for our family. Because of this and as a respect of to my late mum,  I will term this recipes as “My mum fried white bee hoon”. In my household cooking, we usually cooked with 3 main ingredients, no more or no less : pork belly slices, prawns and cai xin or choy sum. Of course, you can add in anything that will suit your taste bud such as eggs stripes, fish cakes, carrots etc. 

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: About 4-5 adult servings

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Main Ingredients

  • 150 grams of rice vermicelli (bee hoon) – soaked
  • 200 grams of prawns – shelled
  • 200 grams of minced pork or pork belly strips
  • 100 grans of choy sum or cai xin  – cut into small chunks
  • 4 shallots – slice thinly

Seasonings

  • Salt to taste
  • 1 chicken stock cubes or any other seasonings such as mushroom concentrate granules, vegetable stocks etc..
  • Dashes of white pepper
  • 1-2 tablespoons of light soya sauce
  • 1-2 tablespoons of corn flour

Note: Feel free to add any side ingredients that you liked such as sausage, egg omelette stripes, carrots, fish cakes and etc..

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Marinate the prawns and pork slices with some corn flour and light soya sauces. For prawns, add drops of sesame oil and dashes of white pepper.

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  • In a frying pan, put the cooking oil, stir fry the shallots under high heat until fragrant. If you prefer, you can add some white pepper and salt at this juncture.  Add in pork slices and stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add in Choy Shim and stir fry for 1 minute. (you can also add the vegetable together with the prawns at the later stage)

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  • Add in water adequate to cover all the ingredients. It shall be about 1 -2 cm above all the ingredients.  Let it boil for about 5 minutes. Add in seasonings:  salt, white pepper, chicken stock or other flavour enhances and light soya sauce). Once it boils, add the prawns and rice vermicelli and let them boil for 2-3 minutes. You will witness the water will be getting less and less and possibly dries up. Off the heat and let it rest in the frying pan  for at least 5-10 minutes for the flavour to be absorbed into the rice vermicelli.

Note:

  • If you do not use any ready made white colour stock, prepare your own fish stock or prawns stock or meat stock for soaking the bee hoon.

  • If you like the soupy version, add slightly more stock and make a corn starch solution to the stock (about 5 tablespoons of corn starch with 10 tablespoons of water). Serve before it dries up.

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CONCLUSION

Hope this simple recipe will help new house chefs on how to stir fry the white bee hoon. There is no secret and do not be extremely concerned about the brand of the rice vermicelli. The way of cooking is the same except some may be more springy and need a bit more time to make it soft. As for the colour, it is the types of seasonings that determine the colour of the fried bee hoon. The rice vermicelli will not break if it is not overly wet.. Remember that you can add any side ingredients of your choice to please the palate of your family members.

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This recipe was included in Page 56-57 of the “One Pot Noodle E-book”. For more One Pot Noodle Dishes, you can have a copy of Easy One Pot Noodles  – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD5.00. The recipes covered various recipes from curry laksa, prawn noodles to fish head beehoon and etc. Of course not forgetting the well like Economy Bee hoon and Mee Rebus . You can purchase by clicking the link above.You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 26 November 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  


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Pumpkin Fried Bee Hoon (金瓜米粉, 南瓜米粉)

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INTRODUCTION

This way of frying rice vermicelli is not what my late mum had taught me though fried rice vermicelli is a common menu item when I was a kid.

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The way she fried bee hoon is totally different, she will sauté the shallots until fragrant, add the rice vermicelli, add seasonings until the rice vermicelli is aromatic. She then dished up the plain rice vermicelli. She put some more oil, sauté the shallots again but this time with meat, prawns and vegetable etc..Once this is ready, she will put the stir fried bee hoon earlier, stir until well mixed and dished up..

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Throughout the entire stir frying process, no water was added.. As such, her fried bee hoon though aromatic and delicious, but was rather dry. Hmmm, I have to admit that when I was a kid, I never like fried bee hoon

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Years ago, when I watched a Taiwanese television food show, the host was demonstrating how he stir fried the famous Taiwanese snack – Pumpkin Bee hoon… Instead of using the word stir frying, soaking may be a more appropriate word of describing the process.  In fact, he is soaking the bee hoon in some meat stock until all the flavourful stock were absorbed by the bee hoon.

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Since then, I have changed my way of frying my bee hoon. I have used his approach in stir frying many types of bee hoon recipes and it all works well. Well, this way of cooking can only be applicable to bee hoon and not other type of noodles be it flat rice noodles (kuay tiao), normal egg noodles and etc.. As bee hoon is very dry and tough to get cooked, soaking them in flavourful stock possibly will be the best method of cooking bee hoon.

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This is a famous Taiwanese noodle dish… There are two ways with regards to the preparation of the pumpkin, one way is to julienne the pumpkin into small strips and stir fry together with the Bee Hoon. At the end of the day, you can see the pumpkin strips on the plate of bee hoon. Another way is the method I am going to share in this illustration, steam and prepare the pumpkin puree, let the bee hoon soaked in the thick pumpkin “soup” and the end result is every strand of bee hoon was coated with pumpkin puree.. Asked me which do I prefer, the pumpkin puree version as the pumpkin puree can sip into the bee hoon more easily.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: About 4-5 adult servings

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  • 250 grams of pumpkin – de-skinned and cut into small chunks.
  • 150 grams of rice vermicelli (bee hoon) – soaked
  • 100 grams of prawns (optional)
  • 150 grams of minced pork or pork belly strips
  • 50 grams of bean sprouts
  • 30 grams of dry shrimps or squid stripes
  • 4 shallots – slice thinly
  • 3 winter mushrooms – soaked and slice thinly
  • 3 sprigs of spring onion
  • 2 tablespoons of cooking oil (optional)
  • Some vegetables such as cai xin or cabbages (optional)

Seasonings (Not in picture)

  • Pinches of salt
  • Dashes of white pepper
  • 1  Chicken stock cube or other preferred seasonings or some sugar to taste
  • 2 tablespoons of light soya sauce

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Rinse and soak the bee hoon until soft.

  • Steam the pumpkin until soft. Either use fork to mash or transfer to a food processor to blend until puree form. Set aside for later use. (note that this step is optional if you prefer to slice your pumpkin into thin strips.

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  • In a frying pan, add 2 tablespoons of cooking oil. Add the spring onions, sliced shallots and winter mushrooms, sauté until fragrant and the shallots are slightly brown. Add the dry shrimps or dry squid strips (鱿鱼丝)。 Stir fry for a minute of two. Add dashes of white pepper followed by the minced meat or pork belly strips. Add about 2-3 cups of water and the chicken stock cubes, bring to boil and let it simmer for about 10 minutes to get the meat stock. Add the pumpkin puree and stir until well mixed.

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  • Add the bee hoon and stir until well mix. Reduce the heat to low and braised the bee hoon until your desired texture. Don’t worry that if the soup stock is too much, it will gradually absorbed by the bee hoon . If the soup dries up too fast, add more water. The longer you braised, the softer and flavourful  is the bee hoon.  Once it reaches your desired texture, add the bean sprouts and prawns, increase the heat to medium and stir fry until the prawns are cooked. Add in additional spring onion or deep fried shallots before dishing up. Prior to servings, sprinkle with deep fried shallots if desired.

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CONCLUSION

I hope readers do give this recipe a chance. The method of cooking is rather controversial but trust me, it will yields a delicious plate of fried bee hoon.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 15 October 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

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Fish Head/Fillet Rice Vermicelli Soup (鱼头/片米粉汤)

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INTRODUCTION

This is long awaiting post. Hiding in my list of recipes to be issued for more than 2.5 months. I told myself that I shall not hold on this recipe anymore.

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Fish soup bee hoon is very common hawker dishes in Singapore and it was so popular that Wikipedia had a write up on this famous dish. Per Wikipedia:

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“Fish soup bee hoon, also known as fish head bee hoon, is a Singaporean soup-based seafood dish, served hot usually with bee hoon. The dish is viewed as a healthy food in Singapore. Catherine Ling of CNN listed fish soup bee hoon as one of the “40 Singapore foods we can’t live without”. Fish soup bee hoon has been available since at least the 1920s; one source credits Swee Kee Fish Head Noodle House with creating the “definitive version” of the dish in the 1970s.

Snakeheads are most commonly used for fish soup bee hoon.Other stalls may offer pomfret, batang.or garoupa. While fish heads or the whole fish may be used, some diners prefer having just fish slices. The fish soup is made out of either fish stock or actual bones, water, oil, yam, and milk,] with vegetables and select fruits.

The noodle in the soup is often bee hoon, although a healthier alternative except for irritable bowel syndrome sufferers would be spaghetti made from brown rice. Another noodle variant would be fried noodles. Additional ingredients include eggs, anchovies, pepper, salt, and alcoholic products such as brandy, Chinese wine, or cognac, chilli slices, fried shallots, and fish roe. For the vegetarian version of the dish, fish meat is substituted with tofu.” (Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_soup_bee_hoon)

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Since Wikipedia already provide such a detail account on this popular Singaporean cuisine, I shall not dealt into details.

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I have prepared this noodle dish from scratch. I went to the wet market to buy a red snapper of about 1.5 kg and ask the seller to help me to debone, cut into fillet size suitable for preparing the noodles soup, and return me with the head, tails and the bones. For readers who are short of time, you can always prepared the dish starting from the point of the recipe that you feel comfortable with.

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Again, since it is a savoury dish, quantities are for your reference and feel free to change the suggested amount of seasonings to suit your taste buds.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: Prepared 4-6 adult servings

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  • One fish of 1-2 kg (Slice the fish flesh in thick pieces and set aside fish head, bones and tails)
  • 5 stalks of spring onion – White portion
  • Few stalks of choy sum (Chinese flowering cabbage)
  • 5 cm of ginger, sliced into thin pieces)
  • 1/4 cup of evaporated milk

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  • 250 grams of rice vermicelli – blanched and set aside.
  • 3-4 leaves of salted vegetable (sliced into thick pieces)
  • 2 fresh tomatoes (cut into 4 quarters each fruit)
  • 2 tablespoons of sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons of anchovies
  • 1 cube of chicken stock
  • 1 – 1.5 tablespoons of fish sauce
  • 1/2 cup of Chinese cooking wine
  • Dashes of white pepper
  • 1 tablespoon of XO alcohol (optional)

Fish meat marinating (depends on the quantity of fish meat that you have)

  • Some sesame oil
  • Pinches of salt
  • Some corn flour (adequate to coat the meat) – 10% of which can be replaced by rice flour to preserve crispiness
  • Dashes of white pepper

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Marinate the fish meat with white pepper, sesame oil, corn flour and salt for about 1 hour. (if you want the deep fried fish meat to stay crispier in a longer time, add a small proportion (1:10) of rice flour to the marinate) In a hot pot with adequate cooking oil, deep fried the fish meat until golden brown. Drain and set aside.

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  • Use the same oil to deep fried the  fish head, bones and tails for 2-3 minutes or until the exterior is cooked. This step is optional and the main purpose of this step is to remove some fishiness of the fish and to preserve the exterior texture of the fish. You can deep fried these either with flour or without flour. Dish up and set aside.

  • In another stock pot, put 1-2 tablespoons of oil and the sesame oil above, Sauté the ginger slices until fragrant, add the anchovies, the white part of spring onion, add water gradually just adequate to cover fried fish head and bones earlier. You can always adjust the water later.

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  • Put in the fish head, fish bones and tails. (Note that at this stage, you can add in the salted vegetables if you want to. However, it will be very difficult to serve the  vegetable as it will mix with the fish bones. Therefore, I have advised to add it at a later stage though adding the salted vegetables at this stages will yield a tastier soup). Bring to boil and let it simmer at medium heat for at least 30-45 minutes. Add water gradually if you find that the water level is low.  In this process, you will witness the fish stock will become milkier (ideally, the stock should be boiled long enough until it is milky and no evaporated milk need to be added. It is attainable but may take at least an hour more). Once done, sift the stock from the first pot to another pot. Throw away the fish head and fish bones.

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  • In the new pot, add the chicken stock, Chinese cooking wine, salted vegetable, diced tomatoes and followed by the evaporated milk. Bring to boil and add seasonings of your choice (fish sauce, dashes of white pepper). Once boiled, off the heat, add the XO (if any) and set aside for assembly. Meanwhile, have a pot of water, blanched the choy sum with some drops of oil and followed by the bee hoon. Drained and set aside.

  • For assembly, have a bowl, put some bee hoon in the serving bowl and followed by some gravy adequate to cover the bee hoon,  put some blanched choy cum, tomatoes and fish meat on top of the rice vermicelli. Garnished with deep fried shallots, dashes of white pepper and chopped coriander or Chinese celery if preferred.  Best served with red cut chilli and some light soya sauce and usually served as a standalone noodle dish. If you do not like rice vermicelli, it can be served as a soup dish that goes well with white rice.

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CONCLUSION

In the current society when time is a constraint,  I am unsure how many readers will go to extent to prepare this noodle dish from scratch. It is slightly laborious but once you take your first bite, you will not regret of the hard work putting in. Based on this pictorial illustration, readers can always choose to start the preparation from the steps that you care comfortable with.

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This recipe was included in Page 30-32 of the “One Pot Noodle E-book”. For more One Pot Noodle Dishes, you can have a copy of Easy One Pot Noodles  – A step by step guide” that was packed with 30 recipes, 60 pages at a reasonable convenience fee of USD5.00. The recipes covered various recipes from curry laksa, prawn noodles to fish head beehoon and etc. Of course not forgetting the well like Economy Bee hoon and Mee Rebus . You can purchase by clicking the link above.You can either pay using Pay Pal or Credit card account. Please ensure that you have an PDF reader like Acrobat or iBooks in your mobile phone or iPad if you intended to read it in your ipad or mobile phone. Should there be any problems of purchasing, feel free to contact me at kengls@singnet.com.sg and separate arrangement can be made.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 8 June 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

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