Homemade Plain Tea Biscuits (家居自制基本茶饼)

IMG_63761

INTRODUCTION

Most of us grew up with western style  biscuits together with Asian items such as kuih, porridges etc.. as our breakfast items…..However, the so called western biscuits that we have then or even now are very different from the biscuits appeared in our recipe books….

IMG_63721

I have many recipes of homemade biscuits from our cook book but none resembles our childhood biscuit  that is plain and can be used to dunk in a cup of milo or coffee or tea… Most were made from butter and texture are slight denser though crispy…  However, it is common that we do make these  biscuits for special festival such as Chinese New Years or occasional indulgence…

IMG_63741

After I issued the Cheesy Bites post and Little Mantou aims for kids, one friend PM me and post in my Facebook picture asking me if I have any recipe for Marie biscuits or Mcvites Rich Tea biscuits. She told me that her kids like the biscuit very much and just try her luck asking if I have the recipe..

IMG_63901

This childhood biscuit really stir up my curiosity to find out further… I make a lot of biscuits but I never make one that I commonly bought from the supermarket.. The external appearance of these biscuits are not oily, plain and have a unique taste but definitely not buttery taste… How can it be so tasty that I liked it for so many years and capture the hearts of many of us… Most will not be able to reject if they were being offered some for breakfasts or teatimes….

IMG_63801

I looked for recipes for Marie Biscuit and I only have one or two recipes to refer but these two recipes are very different… I decided to design my own recipe after reading through the two recipes.. One recipes called for the used of barley malt syrup that I have never seen before, but I suspect “maltose” will help.. All this while, maltose is one of the wonderful ingredients in Chinese pastry and bakers have used it to make their bakes crispy…

IMG_63641

I change the recipe to use maltose… Bingo, yes, the unique taste and crispiness came mainly from maltose..This home made plain biscuits taste very differently from the other western biscuits that I prepared but very much alike the  plain biscuit sprinkled with salt – 咸饼 that are sold in the stores。

IMG_63701

Since this is designed for young kids and toddlers, I will leave you with a lot of alternatives in the ingredients except maltose, flour and milk.  You can use butter if you want; you can omit sugar if prefer; if you prefer denser, use plain flour, fluffier use self raising flour; eggless diet, omit eggs and that all depends on the objectives of your bakes…

IMG_63821


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe inspired from: RICH TEA BISCUITS and Marie Biscuits

Servings: Prepared about 20-25 pieces of 3cm diameter biscuits

IMG_6355

  • 150 grams of self raising flour (alternative plain flour for denser biscuits)
  • 25 grams of cooking oil or melted butter or vegetable shortening
  • 80 grams of milk
  • 1/2 tablespoon of maltose (麦芽糖)
  • One egg yolk (optional – substitute with 25 grams of milk) – not in picture
  • Pinches of salt (optional)

IMG_63861


STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180 degree Celsius

IMG_6360

  • In a big mixing bowl, put all the ingredients (except milk) together, stir until well mixed. Gradually add in the milk, use hand to knead the dough until it form a soft pliable dough. The dough should not be too sticky and rather nice to touch.  If it is too sticky, add flour tablespoon by tablespoon. If it is too dry, add in milk teaspoon by teaspoon.

  • Transfer the dough to a floured working surface, use a rolling pin to roll it until it is about 2mm thickness. Use a cookie cutter to cut the dough  into a circle shape with 3-4 cm diameter. Use something sharp to make holes in the surface. Bake in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for about 15-20 minutes or until it turns crispy. Let the biscuits rest in the baking tray for 5 minutes before transferring the biscuits to a rack for complete cooling. Once cooled, store in an air tight container.

IMG_63681


CONCLUSION

Depending on your objectives of the bake, the biscuits can be as healthy as you want it to be.. This is a nice plain biscuit on its own and I should say that I am happy with this adventure. I hope this will help those readers who are looking for child friendly recipe… Again, never compare homemade biscuits with store bought … It will never be the same as that it is their trade secret and nobody would know their exact ingredients.. With this basic biscuit recipe, feel free to explore more variations, possibly adding cheese or desiccated coconut..

IMG_63921

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_63841


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  


IMG_63661

Homemade White Rabbit Creamy Candy (自制“大白兔”牛奶糖)

IMG_62401 

INTRODUCTION

When Asian Food Channel posted a picture of white rabbit creamy candy in its timeline, it caught my attention because I did not have this sweet for many years. Yes, in fact it brought lots of  childhood memories…I love this candy for its creamy and milk taste….

IMG_62381

I was reading that in a 5 star hotel lobby  while waiting for my guest, I immediately switched  to my Safari looking for a recipe for this candy.. Logically, since this is a Chinese candy, I searched for Chinese recipes.. In fact there are only a handful of recipes in the Chinese website, I only managed to find one that uses only 3 ingredients and  I decided to give it a try 2 days later and I am extremely happy with the outcome… It is made with 3 simple household ingredients but  it is much milkier and softer than the store bought harder candy..Not as sweet as the original version.

IMG_61121

The only imperfection is that  it is not as chewy and become soft rather easily at room temperature and it had to be stored at the refrigerator.. Well, that is totally acceptable to me since all are at home and we will not be bringing these sweets anywhere…I do have a hard time to shape my candy for picture taking since it will become soft when it is in your hand….Possibly some Arabic gum is needed to hold the candy at room temperature, but for me, homemade recipes shall have as little ingredients as possible.

IMG_6252

How popular is this candy? When I posted the photos of these homemade candies in a Facebook Group, within 12 hours, it gathers more than 1000 likes  with over 200 comments and the likes are still growing as at time of writing this report..Not because of my ugly candies but more because it brought fond memories to them and some are requesting for recipes after it was banned years ago (see below).

IMG_62321

Though this candy have accompany most of us to grow up, I found that I knew so little about them until I researched Wikipedia on the status of this candy.. OMG, Wikipedia have such a long write up on them and I have to limit myself to share 5 interesting facts about this candy:

  • White Rabbit Creamy Candy is a brand of candy manufactured by Shanghai Guan Sheng Yuan Food, Ltd. (Chinese: 上海冠生园食品有限公司) pinyin=Shànghǎi Guānshēngyuán Shípǐn Yǒuxiàn Gōngsī, in the People’s Republic of China.

  • White Rabbit sweets have been advertised with the slogan, “Seven White Rabbit candies is equivalent to one cup of milk“, and positioned as a nutritional product in addition to being a sweet. The candies hence accompanied the growth of a generation. Former students of the early Deng Xiaoping era in China (1978 to the early 1990s), have been reported to have taken this slogan literally and made ‘hot milk’ in their dormitory cooking rings by dissolving the candies in a pan of hot water

IMG_61221

  • In 1972, Premier Zhou Enlai used White Rabbit candies as a gift to American president Richard Nixon when the latter visited China. Today White Rabbit candies are China’s top brand of sweet. Although the White Rabbit brand already had some history, its popularity worldwide has grown with the economy of China. Cities and agricultural villages’ demands are increasing, especially during the Chinese New Year period, when many families provide White Rabbit sweets among other candies for visitors. In 2004, White Rabbit candy sales hit 600 million Renmibi, with sales increasing rapidly by a double-digit percentage yearly. The candies are now exported to more than forty countries and territories, including the United States,Europe and Singapore.

IMG_62221

  • White Rabbit Creamy Candy is white, with a soft, chewy texture, and is formed into cylinders approximately 3 cm long and 1 cm in diameter, similar to contemporary western nougat or taffy. Each candy is wrapped in a printed waxed paper wrapper, but within this, the sticky candies are again wrapped in a thin edible paper-like wrapping made from sticky rice. Although the rice wrapping layer is meant to be eaten along with the rest of the candy, it does not figure in the list of ingredients, which is limited to corn starch, syrup, cane sugar,butter, and milk.

IMG_61021

  • When White Rabbit candy was returned to export in 2009, it also underwent a name change to Golden Rabbit Creamy Candy. Aside of avoiding the marketing stigma associated with the tarnished White Rabbit name, the Golden Rabbit candy is made using milk from Australia instead of China. Original White Rabbit is also being manufactured, with milk coming from New Zealand. (Note: that in the period 2007 to 2009, there are various allegations of the candies that were contaminated by chemicals such as melamine and formaldehyde. These lead to recall of the candies and banned by certain countries. It subsequently resumed exporting in 2009) (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rabbit_Creamy_Candy)

IMG_62281


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from: 手工牛奶糖

Servings : a small tray of about 10cm x 8 cm x 1 cm of milk candies

IMG_6089

  • 200 grams of fresh cream for whipping
  • 200 grams of fresh milk
  • 35 grams of castor sugar
  • Some edible rice paper (if you want to wrap the candy)

IMG_62241


STEPS OF PREPARATION

IMG_6094

  • Get ready a container and lined with some aluminium foil or non stick baking paper.

  • In a non stick pan, put the 3 ingredients together. Bring to boil under medium heat. Once it boils, lower to low heat, continue boiling until it thickens, with lots of bubbles and the colour turns light yellowish. During this process, constant stirring is required to prevent burnt in the bottom. The colour will slightly darkens from whitish to beige to light yellow. If you continue to let it boil, it will become brownish meaning the the sugar is burnt and start caramelization. It should be slightly thicker than the consistency of condensed milk. As an estimation, the timing should be about 15-20 minutes.

IMG_6100

  • Transfer to the prepared container and chilled in the freezer after completely cooled for at least 5-6 hours. If time permits, it is best to chill overnight. Cut into your desired sizes and wrapped with edible rice paper if prefer. Best serve directly from the fridge.

IMG_62261


CONCLUSION

Trust me, the sweet is delicious. It is softer and milkier than the store bought version. It will melts in your mouth. I have a hard time of keeping my kids away as they are eyeing on these homemade candies than the store bought version. Reasons are simple, they are eating cream, fresh milk and sugar in a concentrated form. It you are concerned that it is sweet, you can lower the sugar by 10%.. But for me, for a small piece, it is just nice to curb my sugar cravings after a heavy meal.

IMG_61041

 

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_62301


 

  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

IMG_62361

Kuih Became Muffin? Ondeh Ondeh Muffins (椰子小松饼)

IMG_60491

INTRODUCTION

Despite the fact that I am not very happy with the burnt coconuts bits on top of the muffins, I got encouragement from Facebook Group members to issue the recipe and most of them wouldn’t mind the burnt coconuts.. Actually, the brownish colour on top of the muffins is a combination of both the burnt coconut and the palm sugar that oozes out from the muffins.

IMG_60451

I concurred to issue the recipe  as it is a nice, aromatic and moist muffin. Most important of all, it really taste like ondeh ondeh..

IMG_61291

Ondeh Ondeh or Kelpon as the Indonesian called it, is a type of traditional kuih of which a piece of palm sugar is wrapped with a ball of glutinous rice dough and coated with shredded coconut. When cooked, the sugar will melt and when one took a bite, the melted palm sugar will ooze into his or her mouth. For those who do not know what is ondeh ondeh and wanted to know more about ondeh ondeh, you can refer to this post; Don’t Oozes Onto My Shirt!–Sweet Potato Onde Onde

IMG_61311

I can’t claim that the concept of transforming the kuih into a Western muffin or cupcake is an idea of mine.. I remembered one of my friends have asked me many many month’s ago about this cupcake..She said she had seen such a cupcake and whether I know how to prepare it… Without doing any research, I told her it should not be difficult to replicate the concept of ondeh ondeh in a cupcake..

IMG_60571

I totally forgot about this until on Sunday when I was shopping with the family members and saw some stores selling the traditional ondeh ondeh. It suddenly reminds me of this experiment that I wanted to try. I rushed to the supermarket, grab a bag of freshly grated coconut and “chase” my family members to go home earlier so that I could prepare this special breakfast for them..

IMG_60391

This recipe is a recipe of my own and modified from one of my favourite muffins: Start The Year Of Horse With Some Delicious Coconut Muffins. . In order for the muffin to look like an ondeh ondeh, I have resorted to the use of Pandan paste and putting some palm sugar inside the muffins. I have also dusted the muffins with some freshly grated coconuts which I think is not advisable to do since it is very easy to get burnt (unless it is prepared with desiccated coconut)  . Alternatively, like ondeh ondeh, the muffins can be served with freshly grated coconuts instead of baking together with the muffins.

IMG_60351

Taste is awesome. As expected, the palm sugar did not oozes out like the real ondeh ondeh but it did melt inside the muffins and in the surrounding area where the sugar melted, the taste is divine..One word of caution, the cake is like a volcano, the hot melted sugar syrup is looking for any tunnels to flow such that the pressure will not build up inside the cake. Therefore, positioning of the sugar in the centre is of paramount importance such that leaking can be reduced to the minimum.

IMG_60511


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: Prepare about 10-12 medium sized muffins or about 18 small sized muffins

IMG_6004

  • 150 grams of freshly grated coconuts or desiccated coconuts
  • 200 grams of self raising flours
  • 150 grams of melted butter
  • 150 grams of eggs (about 3 eggs)
  • 100 grams of castor sugar
  • 100 grams or ml of coconut cream (milk) – not in the picture
  • 100 grams of palm sugar (Gula Melaka or Gula Apong)
  • 2 teaspoons of Pandan paste
  • Pinches of salt
  • Additional grated coconuts for dusting or toppings (about 50 grams)

IMG_60161


STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180 degree Celsius.

PicMonkey Collage1

  • In a big mixing bowl, put castor sugar, freshly grated coconut, salt and self raising flour. Use a spoon to stir until it is well mix. Make a well in the centre and set aside.

  • In another mixing bowl, put pandan paste, eggs and melted butter and coconut milk. Stir until well mixed. Pour these liquid ingredients onto the centre of the dry ingredients. Use the spoon to lightly and swiftly mix the ingredients. Slight lumps are acceptable for muffins. (Note: if you do not prefer to use Pandan paste, you can blend some fresh pandan leaves with the coconut milk, and sift into the liquid ingredients.)

IMG_6013

  • Fill your baking cups with about 1/3 full, put a small piece of palm sugar (in this illustration, I used Gula Apong) on the top of the batter as centre as possible.  Cover the palm sugar with additional batter until it is about 2/3 cup full. Dust with additional freshly grated coconut if desired. Bake in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for 15-20 minutes (for small muffin cups) or 20-25 minutes (for normal muffin cups). Use a skewer to insert at the side of the muffins and ensure that the skewer comes out clean. Best served warm with additional grated coconuts.

IMG_60471


CONCLUSION

I have no regret of making this batch of ondeh ondeh muffins. It is aromatic and taste very close to the real ondeh ondeh. What make me happy is that family members like it… the reason is simple, because it is moist, coconut flavoured and slightly sweet because of the melted palm sugar. If you do not like the coconut inside the muffin, you can always use this sweet potatoes muffin as the base.  Remember, if you do not want the burnt bits of coconut on top of the muffins, just roll the muffins on top of some freshly shredded coconuts before serving.

IMG_60241

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_60371


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  


IMG_60201

Homemade Chinese Rice Noodles–Hor Fun or He Fen or Guo Tiao (沙河粉,河粉或粿条)

IMG_5982

INTRODUCTION

I will be shocked if any of the Malaysian or Singaporean Chinese readers who do not know about this type of noodles.. Further explanation of this noodle may insult the readers.. ha ha

IMG_5968

But as usual, for the sake of my international readers, let’s see what Wikipedia have written about this common type of Chinese rice noodles..

“Shahe fen or he fen is a type of wide Chinese noodle made from rice. Shahe fen noodles are white in colour, broad, and somewhat slippery. Their texture is elastic and a bit chewy. They do not freeze or dry well and are thus generally (where available) purchased fresh, in strips or sheets that may be cut to the desired width. Where fresh noodles are not available, they may also be purchased packaged in dried form, in various widths.

IMG_5984

While shahe fen and he fen are transliterations based on Mandarin, there are numerous other transliterations based on Cantonese, which include ho fen, hofen, ho-fen, ho fun, ho-fun, hofoen (a Dutch transliteration in Suriname), hor fun, hor fen, sar hor fun, etc. In addition, shahe fen is often synonymously called kway teow (粿條), literally “rice cake strips”, transliteration based on Min Nan Chinese, POJ: kóe-tiâu) or guotiao (pinyin: guǒtiáo; the corresponding transliteration of Mandarin), as in the name of a dish called char kway teow. However, shahe fen and kway teow are strictly and technically not the same (the latter being essentially rice cakes sliced into strips) and the Min Nans in general still consciously make a distinction between shahe fen and kway teow in their speech. Original rice cakes or its strips are very stiff in texture (even after cooking), making them unpopular with modern consumers. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahe_fen)

IMG_5976

Though it can be easily bought in the market and not many readers may be willing to take the hassle to prepare the noodles, however, this post will benefit my overseas’ reader who have difficulty to get freshly prepared noodles…In addition, homemade version is not as oily as commercially sold.. As far as house chefs is concerned, they are likely willing to forgo the perfection of the noodles for the sake of healthiness. Oil is required to separate the noodles such that it will not become lumpy when they are  sold  in the market..

IMG_5980

I am exploring the recipe of hor fun because I found that it is rather interesting to find out homemade versions of certain food that we took for granted… Out of my surprise, the preparation is extremely easy…and only 3 main ingredients were needed, all are common household items…Texture of course will not be as smooth and fine as the counter bought but I can definitely accept these imperfections.  In fact, I found that I prefer the slightly thicker and coarser texture of this home made hor fun especially if it is used for stir frying.

IMG_5988


WHAT IS REQURIED

Servings : About half a kilo of rice noodles

 IMG_5959

  • 200 grams of rice flour
  • 400 grams of water
  • 20 grams of potato starch or corn starch
  • Pinches of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of cooking oil
  • Additional cooking oil for brushing the cooked hor fun

IMG_5972


STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Get ready a steamer and lightly grease a baking tin for steaming.

IMG_5964

  • In a big mixing bowl, place all the dry ingredients together, add 1 tablespoon of cooking oil and water, use a hand whisk to stir the rice solution until well mixed.

  • Put  some rice solution in the baking tin (in this illustration, I used 1/2 cup of rice solution for a 9” round baking tin and it yielded hor fun of about 1 mm thickness).  Swirl around such that it is as even as possible. Steam in a steamer at high heat for about 5-6 minutes or when the rice sheet is not sticky. Take out the baking tin, brush some cooking oil on top of the hor fun, use something sharp object such as fork to take out the big piece of hor fun. Perform the same until all the rice solutions are steamed. When cooled, cut into your desired width before stir frying.

IMG_5974


CONCLUSION

There is a sense of achievement to homemade these noodles that can easily be bought in the market.. Family members never complain about the texture of the hor fun and kids have finished all without knowing that this is homemade. I seriously hope that this post will benefit overseas member who have difficulty to get the commercially sold hor fun..For local members, why not trying to prepare some when time permits..

IMG_5986

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_5970


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  


IMG_5978

 

Hong Kong Short Crust Pastry Egg Tarts (港式蛋挞)

IMG_57461

INTRODUCTION

Egg tarts is a snack that many of us are very familiar.. It is commonly available in bakeries or dim sum restaurants.

IMG_57301

Due to its popularity, Wikipedia do have a precise write up on this custard tart and differentiate between the different types of egg tarts.

IMG_57401

“The egg tart or egg custard tart (commonly romanized as daan taat) is a kind of custard tart pastry found in Portugal, England, Hong Kong, and various Asian countries, which consists of an outer pastry crust that is filled with egg custard and baked. Custard tarts derived from the Portuguese pastry were introduced in Hong Kong in the 1940s by cha chaan tengs via the Portuguese colony of Macau. Hong Kong egg tarts are an adaptation of English custard tarts. Canton (modern Guangdong) had more frequent contact with the West, in particular Britain, than the rest of China. Also, as a former British colony, Hong Kong adopted some British cuisine.

IMG_57621

Today, egg tarts come in many variations within Hong Kong cuisine, including egg white, milk, honey-egg, ginger-flavoured egg, which are variations of a traditional milk custard and egg custard, and also chocolate tarts, green-tea-flavoured tarts, and even bird’s nest tarts. Overall, egg tarts have two main types of crusts: short crust pastry or puff pastry, traditionally made with lard rather than butter or shortening. They are both filled with a rich custard that is much eggier and less creamy than English custard tarts. Unlike English custard tarts, egg tarts are not sprinkled with ground nutmeg or cinnamon before serving. It is also served piping hot rather than at room temperature like English custard tarts. “ (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_tart)

IMG_57501

This is the Hong Kong style version of egg tarts with short crust pastry. It is more common in the bakeries as compared to those sell in the dim sum restaurants with puff pastry. Unlike Portuguese style egg starts that are prepared on a crème Brule style, the surface of the egg tarts are supposed to be yellowish, flat and smooth.

IMG_57741

Preparing egg tarts are not difficult. It can be rather fast if you purchase the ready made tart shell in supermarket. All custard recipes in the egg tarts are basically the same – eggs, milk and sugar. However, to ensure a successful bake of smooth egg tarts, a few pointers will need to be taken into consideration.

IMG_57681

For this post, the tart shell is the same as those for coconut tarts as in this post: How Do You Do? I Missed You, My Dear Friend! – Traditional Coconut Tarts (椰子塔)Hence the tart shell preparation pictures were obtained from there.

IMG_57321


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings : About 12-15 egg tarts depending on the size of tarts mould

  • 1 egg (lightly beaten)
  • 220 grams of plain flour (sifted)
  • 40 grams of icing sugar (sifted)
  • 100 grams of chilled butter (cut into cubes)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla essence (optional)

IMG_5716

  • 220 grams of fresh milk
  • 75 grams of castor sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla essence (optional)

IMG_57381


STEPS OF PREPARATION

Preparing the tart shells – Please note that the tart shell illustration picture is from the post Coconut tarts. Hence the shell moulds are slightly different.

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180 degree Celsius.

IMG_5683

  • In a big mixing bowl, put butter cubes and sifted plain flour together. Use the finger tips to rub the butter cubes and flours together until it become crumby. Add in sifted icing sugars and continue to rub until well mix.

IMG_5692

  • Add lightly beaten eggs and vanilla essence, mix slowly until it become a dough. Put it in the fridge to chill for 20-30 minutes. Note that if you are able to handle soft dough, you can by pass this step. Take the dough from the fridge and use a rolling pin to roll it into a flat sheet with about 0.5 cm thickness.

IMG_56971

  • Use a round cutter to cut about the size of the mould.  Note that this step is optional and will help you to roughly gauge the amount of dough required and you still need to adjust the quantity of dough as you progress.  Use your hand to press the dough against the sides and make it as even as possible. Use a knife or anything sharp to cut off the sides. If preferred, use a fork to lightly make some holes to let any trapped air to escape.  However, this step of making hole is optional. Set aside for later use.

  • For crispier crust, bake the tart shell in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for 10 minutes. However, this step is also optional.

IMG_5721

  • In a microwavable bowl or mug, heat the milk until boiling hot (if you do not have a microwave oven, just heat the milk over the stove). Set aside for the next step.

  • In a big mixing bowl, put egg, sugar and vanilla essence. Use a hand whisk to beat until well mixed. Pour the hot milk to the mixture and use a sift to sieve the custard mixture.

IMG_5726

  • Pour the custard mixture to the pre-baked tart shells.

  • Bake the egg tarts in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for 10-15 minutes. Once the tarts starts to puff up a bit, open the oven door, leave the door ajar and continue to bake the tarts for another 5 –8 minutes. A tart is considered as baked when a toothpick inserted in the centre of the tart, the toothpick stands upright. The tarts is best served warm when the custard is still soft and crust crispy.

IMG_57481


CONCLUSION

Baking egg tarts is not difficult but I did fail a few times.. The failure was not because of the error in the preparation but how well you know your oven. Due to uneven heat distribution in my oven, for the same batch of egg tarts, one or two at a particular corner puffed up much faster and higher than the others… Do play some emphasis in the last 10 minutes of baking, monitor closely the baking process as that is the critical success part of the entire bake..

IMG_57721

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_57421


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

IMG_57701

This Glutinous Rice Cake Is Entirely Different From Store Bought … Ningbo Niangao, Shanghai Niangao or Bai Guo Gan (宁波年糕,上海年糕,白果干)

IMG_59471

INTRODUCTION

I swore I never like to cook this glutinous rice cake (Ningbo Niangao (宁波年糕) or Shanghai Niangao (上海年糕)or Bai Guo Gan (白果干) ) as it has to be soaked for many days before it turn soft. In addition, it is rather difficult to stir fry as it can turn mushy if too much water is added….

IMG_59271

While I was glancing through the internet yesterday, I found a simple recipe of this glutinous rice cake.. Looking at the ingredients , it is just a 3 simple ingredients recipes and all are common household items. Out of my curiosity, I have decided to give it a try thinking without having any expectations on the rice cake.

IMG_59231

It didn’t take long for me to finish the preparation of this glutinous rice cake.. about an hour from preparation until finished steaming. I let it rest a night and early in the morning, I cut the rice cake and fry it in a vegetarian version.. When I took the first bite, I immediately knew that why this rice cake managed to capture the hearts of many Chinese. The texture is totally different as it is soft and chewy and it totally change my perception of this traditional rice cake.

IMG_59491

As per Wikipedia:

“The Shanghai Niangao style is usually packaged in a thick soft rod to be sliced up or packaged pre-sliced and either stir-fried or added to soup. Depending on the cooking method this style is a soft to a chewy variant. The Shanghai style keeps the nian gao white, and made with non-glutinous rice. The color is its distinct feature. When served as a dish, the most common is the stir-fry method, hence the name (炒年糕, chǎo nián gāo). There are three general types. The first is a savory dish, common ingredients include scallions, beef, pork, cabbage, Chinese cabbage etc. The second is a sweet version using standard white sugar. The last version is taste-less, and is often consumed for its chewy textures.” (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nian_gao)

IMG_59531

The main objective of this post is the sharing of the preparation of this rice cake. However, I will also share a recipe of how to stir fry the rice cake. As I am on a vegetarian diet, the illustration uses vegetarian ingredients but you can always add in meats, shallots and garlics when you are stir frying.

IMG_59571

Whether or not this rice cake is linked to Korean rice cakes or Japanese rice cakes, I am unsure but I believed they are closely linked as food history are all intertwined and not to mention that they are in the same geographical regions.

IMG_59451


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from 自制寧波年糕

Servings: 2-3 persons

IMG_5905

Rice Cake

  • 120 grams of glutinous rice flour (糯米粉)
  • 120 grams of rice flour (粘米粉)
  • 140 grams or ml of water (清水)

IMG_5925

Stir Frying Rice Cake

  • 380 grams of rice cake (as above), cut slanting into bite size pieces
  • 5 winter mushrooms, sliced
  • 6 cm of carrots, shredded
  • 3 dried bean curd puff, cut into stripes
  • 50 grams of Szechuan vegetables, soaked and cut into stripes
  • 50 grams of mock chicken, chopped (not in picture) – Substitutable with minced pork or chicken
  • Some chopped ginger or garlics or shallots
  • Oyster sauce, to taste
  • light soya sauce, to taste
  • Dashes of white pepper

All quantities and ingredients are for your reference as this is a savoury dish.

IMG_59211

 


STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Get ready a steamer capable of steaming under high heat for at least 30 minutes and a small pot of hot boiling water.

IMG_5910

  • In a big mixing bowl, sift in the glutinous rice flour and rice flour. Add the water gradually and knead until it form a pliable dough. If too dry, add water tablespoon by tablespoon. If too wet, add glutinous rice flour tablespoon by tablespoon.

  • Take out about 40 grams of the dough, shape it round, pat in the hand and throw it to the pot of hot boiling water. Cook for 3-4 minutes or until the dough floats in the water. Transfer this small dough to the mixing bowl. The purpose of this step is to ensure that the rice cake have a chewy texture.

IMG_5915

  • Use your hand to knead the  cooked and uncooked dough together until well mixed. Divide equally into 6 portions. Shape cylindrical shape and steam in the steamer for about 25 minutes. Once done, to avoid sticking to each other, you can lightly grease the rice cake  with cooking oil and let it cool completely before cutting into pieces for stir frying. For this illustration, I have let it rest overnight. The longer it rest at room temperature, the harder it will be as moisture are lost in the process.

IMG_5932

  • Slice the rice cake into small pieces. In a hot wok or frying pan, put some cooking oil, put the minced ginger or shallot or garlics and sliced winter mushroom. Sauté until fragrant. Add in the mock chicken or minced meat, stir fry for one two minutes followed by all other ingredients. Stir fry until well mixed.

IMG_5937

  • Add in the sliced rice cake, stir fry followed by adding white pepper and oyster sauce. Stir fry for another few minutes and dish up. If in the process of stir frying, the dish is too dry, you can add a small quantity of water but not too much as it will make the rice cake mushy. Best served when warm.

IMG_59171


CONCLUSION

Again, I was shocked that home made rice cake’s texture is totally different from the store bought version. It is soft and chewy. It is easy to prepare with simple ingredients. If you like Korean or Japanese rice cake, I am sure all of you will like this too. As this is a savoury dish, all measurement are for your reference. Feel free to change what suit your taste bud. You can always use the same ingredients that you stir fry your noodles for the dish.

IMG_59551

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_59411


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

IMG_59511

Chinese Horseshoe Biscuits, Ma Ti Su, Beh Teh Soh, Heong Paeng (马蹄酥, 香饼)

IMG_56141

INTRODUCTION

This is the last among the three Chinese flaky skin biscuits besides Chinese sugar puff (pong pia, 太阳饼,碰饼) and Sweetheart cake (老婆饼)..

IMG_57011

Preparation is almost the same except the fillings and slight modification in the crust to make it more crispy.

IMG_56411

In Chinese, it was called ma ti su or beh teh soh or 马蹄酥 literally translated as “horseshoe biscuits”. It is also called heong Paeng (香饼)by the Cantonese or retranslated into “fragrant puffs” “aromatic puffs” etc..

IMG_56451

In my humble opinion, though the Chinese name of the biscuits have the word “water chestnut’, the biscuits should not have anything to do with water chestnut, instead it means that the shape resemble the horseshoe in the horse’s leg. It is brownish in colour and shape liked a horseshoe.. 

IMG_56291

Frankly speaking, there are not many recipes in the internet and most recipes are “experimental” recipes and I am shocked that one recipe even called for the use of water chestnut or 马蹄 . ..

IMG_56551

This is a recipe of my own adventure. After preparing the above two biscuits which were closely related, I have came out with the recipe of this biscuit for readers to try out. The outcome is satisfactory.

IMG_56471

Wife concurred that the taste is rather close and gooey texture is almost there. If you think the biscuits look like the one you seen before, I hope that you can give it a chance too!

IMG_56311


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Dough Recipe adapted from: 太阳饼

Servings: Prepare about 15 horseshoe biscuits

IMG_5536_thumb[1]_thumb

Water Dough

  • 120 grams of plain flour (普通面粉)
  • 15 grams of castor sugar (细砂糖)
  • 40 grams of lard or cooking oil or vegetable shortening (猪油或食用油或白油)
  • 50 grams of plain water (水)
  • 2 tablespoons of maltose (麦芽糖)

 

 IMG_5540_thumb[1]_thumb

  • 80 grams of plain flour (普通面粉)
  • 40 grams of lard or cooking oil or vegetable shortening (猪油或食用油或白油)

IMG_5605

  • 80 grams of cooked glutinous rice flour (糕粉)
  • 80 grams of castor sugar or brown sugar (白糖或核糖)
  • 65 grams of cold water (冷水) – not in picture
  • 30 grams of deep fried shallots (油葱)
  • 40 grams of maltose (麦芽糖)
  • 20 grams of cooking oil or shallot oil (食用油或葱油)
  • 20 grams of roasted black sesame seeds (黑芝麻)
  • 1 tablespoon of dark sticky soya sauce (optional) (黑酱油)
  • Pinches of salt (盐巴)
  • Some white sesame seeds for sprinkling (白芝麻)

IMG_56371


STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180 degree Celsius

IMG_5543_thumb[1]_thumb

  • Put all the water dough ingredients in a bowl, stir and knead until it form a smooth pliable dough. Let it rest for 15 minutes.. Weigh the dough and divide into 15 equal portions. Set aside.
  • Put all the oil dough ingredients in a bowl, stir until well combine and smooth. Let it rest for 15 minutes. Weigh the dough and divide into 15 equal portions. Set aside.

IMG_5610

  • In a big bowl, mix all the ingredients together, mixed until it forms a pliable dough. If you are using the brown sugar, there is no need to add the dark soya sauce as the main purpose is purely for colouring purposes. If the dough is too dry, add teaspoon by teaspoon of cold water. If the dough is too wet, add tablespoon by tablespoon of cooked glutinous rice flour until it form a pliable dough. Weigh the dough and divide into 15 equal portions. Set aside for later use.

PicMonkey Collage1

  • Take one portion of water dough, shape round, flatten it , put a portion of oil  dough on top of the water dough, seal it and shape it round. Use a rolling pin to roll the ball into a rectangular shape as evenly and as thin as possible. Roll it up like you are preparing Swiss roll. Turn the “Swiss roll” direction with the shorter side pointing at you. Use a rolling pin to roll it again in a rectangular shape as evenly and as thin as possible. Roll it up again like you are preparing Swiss roll.  Use the rolling pin to flatten it.

  • Put a brown filling on top of the rolled dough, seal the edges, shape it round and use the hand to lightly flatten it so that it looks like a disc shape. Sprinkle with some white sesame seeds. Bake in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for 15-20 minutes.  (not that the illustration is for other biscuits, the filling should be brown in colour as in the earlier filling’s picture).

IMG_56251


CONCLUSION

I cannot say that this is exactly the same as what is sold outside. However, it is aromatic and full of gooey, sticky dark colour fillings. The crust is much harder than its sister biscuits due to the use of the maltose..If after a few days, the fillings of the biscuits become slightly hard, microwave for 30 seconds and you will have a soft gooey fillings again. Do try to prepare some and let me know if this is the biscuit that you are fond of?

IMG_56231

Hope you like the post today. cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_56331


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

IMG_56191

Winter Melon Puff or Wife Biscuit or Sweet Heart Cake (老婆饼)

IMG_5675

 

INTRODUCTION

This is  another Chinese traditional puff that is commonly found in Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong..

IMG_5681

As mentioned in the post of Sugar Puff (Pong Piah) , this is the second biscuits that I prepared yesterday . The puff skin is slightly softer as compared to the sugar puff and horseshoe biscuits as no maltose was added..

IMG_5691

As Per Wikipedia

“A sweetheart cake or wife cake is a traditional Cantonese pastry with flaky and thin skin made with winter melon, almond paste, and sesame, and spiced with five spice powder).[1] “Wife cake” is the translation of lou po beng from Cantonese, and although the meaning is “wife,” the literal translation is “old lady cake,” paralleling the colloquial usage of “old lady” for “wife” in American English. The cake is still popular among many in Hong Kong and Mainland China. Many people in Hong Kong, as well as professional chefs, also bake “modern” varieties of this cake.

IMG_5683

There are many legends that attempt to explain the origins of the Sweetheart cake. One tells the tale of a couple that lived a very poor life, in imperial China. They loved each other and lived in a small village. Suddenly, a mysterious disease spread. The husband’s father became very sick. The couple spent all of their money in order to treat the man’s father, but he was still sick. The wife sold herself as a slave in exchange for money to buy medicine for her father-in-law.

IMG_5714

Once the husband learned about what his wife did, he made a cake filled with sweetened winter melon and almond. He dedicated this pastry to his wife, whom he could never forget, and sold it in the street. His cake became so popular that he was able to earn enough money to buy his wife back “ (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweetheart_cake)

IMG_5677

There are many recipes in the internet for the fillings of which some uses fresh winter melon for the puff, however, for this recipe, candied winter melon was used and the taste is not being compromised.

  IMG_5687


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Dough Recipe adapted from: 太阳饼

Filling Recipe adapted from: Winter Melon Puffs / Lou Poh Paeng 老婆餅

Servings: 8 Biscuits

IMG_5536_thumb[1]

Water Dough

  • 120 grams of plain flour (普通面粉)
  • 15 grams of castor sugar (细砂糖)
  • 40 grams of lard or cooking oil or vegetable shortening (猪油或食用油或白油)
  • 50 grams of plain water (水)

Please disregard the spoon above. It was subsequently not used.

 IMG_5540_thumb[1]

  • 80 grams of plain flour (普通面粉)
  • 40 grams of lard or cooking oil or vegetable shortening (猪油或食用油或白油)

IMG_5658

Winter Melon Filling

  • 100 grams of candied winter melon (糖冬瓜条)
  • 20 grams of cooked glutinous rice flour or gao fen (糕粉)
  • 15 grams of sesame seeds (白芝麻)
  • 15 grams of castor sugar (细砂糖)
  • 1 teaspoon of cooking oil (食用油)
  • 50-60 grams or ml of water (水)
  • Pinches of salt (盐巴)

OTHERS

  • One egg yolk for egg brushing

IMG_5710


STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180 degree Celsius

IMG_5543_thumb[1]

  • Put all the water dough ingredients in a bowl, stir and knead until it form a smooth pliable dough. Let it rest for 15 minutes.. Weigh the dough and divide into 8 equal portions. Set aside.
  • Put all the oil dough ingredients in a bowl, stir until well combine and smooth. Let it rest for 15 minutes. Weigh the dough and divide into 8 equal portions. Set aside.

IMG_5663

  • In a food processor, put all the filling ingredients and blend until fine. Divide into 8 equal balls and set aside for later use. If the dough is too sticky, add  plain flour or gao fen teaspoon by teaspoon. If it is too dry, add water teaspoon by teaspoon.

IMG_5555_thumb[3]

  • Take one portion of water dough, shape round, flatten it , put a portion of oil  dough on top of the water dough, seal it and shape it round. Use a rolling pin to roll the ball into a rectangular shape as evenly and as thin as possible. Roll it up like you are preparing Swiss roll. Turn the “Swiss roll” direction with the shorter side pointing at you. Use a rolling pin to roll it again in a rectangular shape as evenly and as thin as possible. Roll it up again like you are preparing Swiss roll.

IMG_5671

  • Use the rolling pin to flatten it. Put a filling on top of the rolled dough, seal the edges, shape it round and use the rolling pin to lightly flatten it so that it looks like a disc shape with about 7.5 mm thick. Use some fork to make holes in the dough and use a sharp knife to cut two parallel lines on the cake.

IMG_5697

  • Egg wash the cake thoroughly before baking in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for 12-15 minutes. For egg washing, crack one egg yolk,beat thoroughly before application to the cake.

IMG_5685


CONCLUSION

Which do you prefer? This sweetheart cake  or the sugar puff yesterday? Or you are waiting to try the Horseshoe Biscuits (ma teh soh) that i am going to share soon?

IMG_5703

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_5712


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

IMG_5679

Sugar Puff, Sun Biscuit And Pong Piah (太阳饼, 碰饼)

IMG_5593

INTRODUCTION

Friends are asking me what to do with the fried glutinous rice flour (gao fen 糕粉) left after the preparation of snow skin moon cake.. The first thing that comes into my mind is one category of Chinese flaky skin biscuits  with gooey fillings since gao fen is the main ingredient  that create the sticky gooey fillings..

IMG_5585

The biscuits that come into my mind are the famous Hong Kong Wife biscuits (老婆饼, Taiwanese Sun biscuits (太阳饼), local Pong Pia (蓬饼 / 碰饼) and the Perak famous Horseshoe Biscuits (马蹄饼) 

IMG_5587

I wanted to prepare my childhood biscuit – Pong Pia. When I search for recipe in the internet, none appeared but it directed me to another Chinese biscuits, Sun biscuits. I knew there are minor differences in the fillings between the two since I have tasted both. Sun biscuit filling is less sticky and more creamy as butter and plain flour were used. However, Pong Pia filling is slightly more sticky since it uses mostly gao fen.

IMG_5573

I prepared the biscuits and I  am happy with the biscuit  as the taste is very much the same as the Pong Pia except the slightest differences discussed above. 

IMG_5579

After I posted the Sun Biscuit photo in Facebook, Group members are asking me the differences between horseshoe biscuit and wife biscuits… On the same day, I prepared the horseshoe biscuits and wife biscuits. In the next two posts, I will share the recipes of these two biscuits and you can see how similar are there in terms of preparations of ingredients.

IMG_5571

For traditional Chinese biscuits, most will call for the use of lard or recently vegetable shortening, however, for this recipe, i have used normal cooking oil to substitute and I personally found that the texture is not being compromise much.

IMG_5565


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from: 太阳饼

Servings: 10 Biscuits

IMG_5536

Water Dough

  • 120 grams of plain flour
  • 15 grams of castor sugar
  • 40 grams of lard or cooking oil or vegetable shortening
  • 50 grams of plain water
  • 1/2 teaspoon of maltose

 IMG_5540

  • 80 grams of plain flour
  • 40 grams of lard or cooking oil or vegetable shortening

IMG_5545

Fillings

  • 80 grams of icing sugar
  • 20 grams of maltose
  • 15 grams of butter
  • 25 grams of plain flour
  • 8 grams or ml of water
  • Pinches of salt

IMG_5577


STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180 degree Celsius

IMG_5543

  • Put all the water dough ingredients in a bowl, stir and knead until it form a smooth pliable dough. Let it rest for 15 minutes.. Weigh the dough and divide into 10 equal portions. Set aside.
  • Put all the oil dough ingredients in a bowl, stir until well combine and smooth. Let it rest for 15 minutes. Weigh the dough and divide into 10 equal portions. Set aside.

IMG_5550

  • Put all the fillings ingredients in a bowl, stir until well combine and smooth. Weigh the fillings and divide into 10 equal portions. Set aside.

IMG_5555

  • Take one portion of water dough, shape round, flatten it , put a portion of oil  dough on top of the water dough, seal it and shape it round. Use a rolling pin to roll the ball into a rectangular shape as evenly and as thin as possible. Roll it up like you are preparing Swiss roll. Turn the “Swiss roll” direction with the shorter side pointing at you. Use a rolling pin to roll it again in a rectangular shape as evenly and as thin as possible. Roll it up again like you are preparing Swiss roll.

IMG_5561

  • Use the rolling pin to flatten it. Put a filling on top of the rolled dough, seal the edges, shape it round and use the rolling pin to lightly flatten it so that it looks like a disc shape. Bake in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for 10-12 minutes.

  • Make sure the dough is properly wrapped and baking time is as per suggested to avoid gooey sticky hot fillings leak out from the biscuit.

IMG_5567


CONCLUSION

This is the Sun biscuit but the filling is slightly different from the Pong Piah commonly found in Singapore and Malaysia that uses cooked glutinous rice flour or Gao Fen. If I managed to find a recipe that uses Gao Fen for the filling, I will update the recipe to make the post more complete.. Do watch out for the next two post and I will share Wife biscuits and horseshoe biscuits.

IMG_5575

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_5583


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

IMG_5589

 

Basic Bread Dough Recipe And Plum Blossom Sausage Buns (梅花香肠面包)

IMG_4803

INTRODUCTION

This is a simple dough recipe that I would like to recommend readers to consider keeping for preparing common breakfast buns. It is is easy and faster to prepare and yields a soft and fluffy bread. It can be used for many buns, donuts and even pizza.

IMG_4777

I usually prepare about 500 grams of dough (flour only), used the portion I wanted , deep freeze the dough and used in for the next few bakes. For more detail of Deep freezing and thawing frozen dough, please refer to: Freezing And Thawing Yeasted Bread Dough.

IMG_4799

In this post I will share the basic dough recipe, shaping of plum blossom sausage buns and pizza crust.

IMG_4793

Using the same bread dough and with slight modifications in various batches, I have prepared the following:

Hot dog Buns

Deep fried donuts

Red Bean Flower Sweet Buns

 

Blueberry Sweet Bread

Hamburger Buns

 IMG_5501


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: about 1 kilo of bread dough

IMG_4424

Bread dough

  • 500 grams of bread flour
  • 100 grams of sugar
  • 5 grams of salt
  • 11 grams (1 packet) of instant dry yeast
  • 30 grams of butter (melted) or cooking oil
  • 1 egg
  • 220 grams of plain water

IMG_4749

For Plum Sausage Buns

  • 5 sausages
  • 1 egg
  • Some spring onion or parsley
  • 250 grams of  frozen dough
  • Pinches of salt
  • 1 teaspoon of cooking oil

IMG_4783


STEPS OF PREPARATION

Preparation of basic dough

IMG_4429

  • In a mixing  bowl, mixed all the ingredients  together. Use a spoon to slightly stir it until it form a sticky dough. Use the dough hook in the machine to beat the dough at medium to low speed (speed 2 in Kenwood Chef or Kitchen Aid) for about 5 minutes. After 5 minutes, change from medium to high speed (speed 4 kin Kenwood Chef or Kitchen Aid) for about 7 minutes until the dough is smooth and leaves the side of the mixing bowl. Transfer the dough out to a lightly flour surface.

PicMonkey Collage1

  • Lightly knead for 1-2 minutes and let it proof until double in size. Cover the dough with a wet towel or clingy wrap. Proofing time will depends on the weather but it will take about more or less 30 minutes in Singapore weather.

  • After first proofing, take the portion of dough you want to use and keep the others in the freezer. Best practise is to let the proof dough go into the freezer in a bowl without wrapping. Once the dough cool down about 1 hour later, wrap the dough in some clingy wrap and place in an air tight container. The reason for this step is to avoid water vapour condensation that may wet your dough when you are defrosting. Once the yeast is dormant, no more carbon dioxide will be released and wrapping the dough will not yield any water condensation droplets.


Preparation of Pizza Crust

Note that this pizza crust was prepared using fresh dough and the remaining I have used it for the preparation of plum blossom sausage buns as shared below.

PicMonkey Collage2

  • Put some of the fresh dough (after first proofing), shape round and put on a piece of baking paper. Put on top of the dough ball another piece of baking paper. Roll the ball using a rolling pin in a round shape the size and thickness you want. Let it proof until it double in size and bake in the pre-heated oven of 190 degree Celsius for 10-15 minutes.

IMG_4449

  • Continue the preparation of pizza by putting your desired topping and baked again until the cheeses melts.

IMG_4451

Note:

  • I have used 250 grams for making two 9” pizzas but that depends on how thick and how big you want your pizza to be. Therefore, some discretion on the quantity used is needed when you prepare the dough).

  • If you want thin and crispy pizza, your dough should be much smaller and your thickness of dough before proofing should be about 2 mm. (end pizza thickness = 4 mm) For thicker pizza, generally the dough thickness should be about 5 mm before proofing. (end pizza thickness = 1 cm)

IMG_4463


Preparation Of Plum Blossom Sausage Buns

Note that I have prepared this plum blossom sausage buns based on the frozen dough that I prepared for the pizza crust earlier. It was deep froze for about a week.

IMG_4754

  • Take out the frozen dough, once the dough is slightly soft and can be cut by knife (5 minutes later), cut 5 dough of 50 grams each. Let it defrost in the room temperature until completely soft. As this is a small dough, therefore, defrosting is very fast and probably it will take about 10 minutes depending on the day’s weather.

  • Once the dough is soft, put in a flour surface, roll the dough using a rolling pin into a square shape following the length of your sausage. Put a sausage on top of the dough. Pat the dough with some flour if there are some water vapour condensation on the dough.

IMG_4760

  • Use the dough to roll up the sausage. Cut into 5 equal pieces. Twist the dough such that the five cut surfaces of the sausage face upwards. Don’t worry that your twisting will be ugly, as long as the cut sausage is of the same length/size and the dough properly wrapped the sausages, it will look okay after second proofing and final baking.

IMG_4765

  • Pre=heat the oven to 190 degree Celsius.

  • Get ready a bowl, mix the egg, pinches of salt , chopped onion or parsley and cooking oil. Stir until well combined. If you wish, you can add other spices such as black pepper or substitute with oregano.

  • After second proofing, take a small spoon and put some of the egg mixture on the centre of the sausage dough. If there are extra, just brush it on the side of the buns. Bake in the pre-heated oven of 190 degree Celsius for 10-12 minutes or when the bread turn golden brown.

IMG_4795


CONCLUSION

If this basic dough recipe works for many bakes, why is there a need to keep many recipes… A rather long post and hope  I  did not miss out any point ..

PicMonkey Collage3

Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

IMG_4801

 


  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 28 July 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

 

IMG_4797