Cake or Bread? Cake Bread (蛋糕面包)

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UPDATED POST ON 8-10-2014

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN TOWARDS THE END FOR AN UPDATED POST OF THIS RECIPE.


INTRODUCTION

It is bread surrounded by a cake…Rather confusing. A bread dough was placed in the loaf tin, prior to the baking of the bread, some cake  batter was poured on top of the bread and baked together. At the end of the day, a loaf of cake surrounded bread was produced. The texture of the cake is very soft and blends well with the fully proofed bread.

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I have obtained this recipe from Ms Adeline Sim from my Facebook Group – Food bloggers and Foodies United. She had disclosed her recipe in her post and I have decided to try it out. In fact it this bake item is quite common in Singaporean and Malaysian bakeries.

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As I do not have her required mould of 450 grams, I have used a standard loaf Pullman tin 9”x4”x5”  for the cake bread. Half way while I was preparing, I found that my cake batter was inadequate to cover the whole loaf. Therefore, in this recipe, I will increase the egg batter from 4 eggs (as in the illustration ) to 6 eggs. With this portion, reader’s final cake bread will have more cake portion than what is illustrated here.

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I should not say that the preparation is easy. It is definitely quite laborious but it will pays off when you take the first  bite. The recipe yields both cake and bread of almost the same texture. Soft, fine and is definitely a good breakfast item to go with a cup of tea or coffee.

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Whether or not to go with jam is up to individual, but I prefer to dip in my cup of coffee.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from: Ms Adeline Sim’s Cake Bread

Servings: Prepare 1 loaf of 9” x 4” x 5” Loaf

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Bread Portion

  • 250 grams of bread flour
  • 10 grams of milk powder
  • 15 grams of cocoa powder
  • 30 grams of butter
  • 3 grams of instant yeast or 6 grams of active dry yeast
  • 160 grams of water
  • 20 grams of castor sugar
  • One egg yolk
  • Pinches of salt

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Cake Portion

  • 165 grams of cake flour
  • 6 eggs
  • 120 grams of sugar
  • 45 grams of corn oil
  • 45 grams of  milk powder

* Note that cake portion have been adjusted to 6 eggs instead of 4 eggs as in the illustration.

Others:

  • Pullman loaf tin of 9” x 4” x 5”

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Lightly greased the Pullman tin using some cooking oil or butter.

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  • Put all ingredients (except butter) in a big mixing bowl, stir using a spoon until a sticky dough is form. Change to a stand mixing bowl, use the dough hook to knead the dough at low speed for about 15 minutes, add butter and increase the speed until high. Knead for another 15 minutes until the dough is smooth and leaves the sides of the mixing bowl.

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  • Take out the dough and lightly knead in a flat surface dusted with some bread flour. Shape the dough into a loaf shape and transfer into the Pullman tin. Let it proof for about 1/2 hour or until it double in size whichever is earlier. (Note that I did not do second proofing but if you prefer, you can let it proof for the first time until double in size, punch, knead and shape the dough into the loaf tin and let it have a second proofing for about another 15-20 minutes. In this way, there will be no embarrassing holes in your bread portion).

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  • Please scroll down to see an updated post of making cake portion via egg separation method. Alternatively, you can use this sponge cake method.

  • Just before the dough is almost done, beat the egg in the stand mixer until bubbly. Add sugar gradually spoon by spoon. Increase the speed until high and beat until the volume expand about twice. Add the corn oil gradually and let it beat until combined (about 1 minute). Sift in the cake flour and milk powder into the batter.

  • Preheat the oven to 170 degree Celsius .

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  • Quickly use a spatula to fold in the flour until well mixed. Pour the cake batter over the proofed bread.

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  • Baked in the oven at 170 degree Celsius for 45 minutes.  After 25 minutes, slide in the Pullman tin cover to prevent the cake bread from getting burnt. After 45 minutes, perform the skewer test by inserting a skewer into the middle of the cake bread and ensure that it comes out clean.

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UPDATED POST ON 8-10-2014

Today, I have decided to prepare this as breakfast. I have done minor modifications to the preparation and instead of normal sponge cake preparation method, I have used chiffon cake method by using egg separation method.

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Texture wise, it is slightly better than the above. Since I am running out of eggs, I have used 4 eggs instead, as such the cake portion is slightly less. Therefore, it is advisable that reader follow the above recipe and use egg separation method instead.

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However, to save some time, you can by ready sponge cake pre-mix, prepare in accordance with the packaging instructions and pour on the bread dough.

Cake portion by egg separation method

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  • Segregate egg whites and egg yolks. For the yolk portion, whisk the egg yolk until fluffy, add 1/2 of the sugar and cooking oil, stir until well combined. Sift in the cake flour and milk powder. Set aside for later use.

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  • Beat the egg white until soft peak, add the remaining sugar until firm peak.

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  • Pour one third of the egg white to the yolk batter, fold until well mixed. Pour the mixed batter to the remaining 2/3 of egg whites, fold until well mix and pour the cake batter into the tin.

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CONCLUSION

Not a very difficult bake but patience is required to do the cake bread. Be it cake bread or bread cake is up to you, ha-ha. I have decided to use cake bread since bread portion is more than my cake portion. I especially the overall texture of this special bread. Lastly, thanks Ms Adeline Sim for her generous in sharing the recipe. Remember, as the recipe is adjusted to have 6 eggs, therefore your cake portion will be much bigger than mine. To avoid embarrassing holes trapped inside the bread, please do second proofing of bread if times permit.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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  • For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 8 June 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit the blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE to keep abreast of my future posts.  

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Four Seasons Blog Hop #46 (17 April 2014)

Welcome to the Four Seasons Blog Hop

A party where we can celebrate the greatness that each season brings to our lives.
To be interested in the changing seasons is a happier state of mind than to be hopelessly in love with spring.
Thank you to everyone who shared their wonderful creations last week and to all of you who are joining us new this week!

So Let’s Get This Party Started!!Let's Get this Party Started Share your  food creations, gardening, clever projects, tablescapes, decorations, party themes, and inspirational knowledge … Ok, you get the point.  Join us every Thursday (opens Wednesday evening at 6:00 pm). Please stay for awhile and show some love to the guests, join us in the fun and grab a button. Four Seasons Blog Button

We will share your posts in a variety of ways on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus.  We will also have features of the week! Be sure to follow our Four Seasons Board on Pinterest!

By participating in this linky party, you agree to have your posts shared on social media and Pinterest and to receive email and Google notifications for reminders about the party. If you don’t want to receive notifications, please let us know.

Featured Blogger

This week we are featuring ablogger who has been long time guests at our parties. She has a very lovely and creative blog and we always look forward to seeing what they have been up to each week. Please stop by and check them out and say hi while you’re there. Meet Jenna Meon  who is “an artist, designer, daughter, sister,  wife, mother, mother-in-law, sister-in-law,  grandmother, friend and general sounding board. I try to live an artful life, as in an art filled life, being creative everyday and grateful for every moment.  I have a little business called JMdesigns which is all about hand painted original designs, on glassware and decorative accessories.

FEATURED POSTS

PLEASE ENTER THE ICON ABOVE TO ENTER YOUR LINK

Extra Large Chinese Barbecue Pork Buns–Char Siu Bao (蜜汁叉烧包)

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INTRODUCTION

Frankly speaking, I never expect my Char Siu Bao (or barbecue pork steamed buns) were so big. It shocked me actually. I expect it to be a cute little buns like at least 50% similar to those in the dim sum restaurant. When I opened my steamer cover, the buns have increased by about almost 100%and most of the flower design became not obvious.

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I roughly knew the reasons. It  could be due to the adequate proofing time and the use of double acting baking powder instead of the normal baking powder. .In addition, it is because of the weightage of the dough. While for a small Char Siu Bao, the dough shall be about 30 grams but as my hands are rather big, I have wrapped using 60 grams of dough and this is the dough that is just nice for the wrapping .

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As consistent with other post, it will definitely not a bad idea to understand more about Char Siu Bao via Wikipedia:

“Cha siu bao or char siu bao is a Cantonese barbecue-pork-filled bun (baozi). The buns are filled with barbecue-flavoured cha siu pork. They are served as a type of dim sum during yum cha and are sometimes sold in Chinese bakeries。 Cha siu refers to the pork filling; the word bao simply means “bun”. Although visually similar to other types of steamed baozi, the dough of steamed cha siu bao is unique since it makes use of both yeast and baking powder as leavening.This unique mix of leavening gives the dough of cha siu bao the texture of a slightly dense, but fine soft bread.  Encased in the centre of the bun is tender, sweet, slow-roasted pork tenderloin. This cha siu is diced, and then mixed into a syrupy mixture of oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, roasted sesame seed oil, rice vinegar, shaoxing wine or dry sherry, soy sauce, sugar and corn starch.” (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cha_siu_bao

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A few points can be concluded from such definition. It is leavened using both yeast and baking powder. In fact, for smiling Char Siu Bao like those in the Hong Kong Dim Sum restaurant, another ingredient is needed – ammonia bicarbonate. A type of leavening agent that will produce carbon dioxide when heated and hence giving the dough more air and a fluffier texture. Secondly, It is usually seasoned with oyster sauce, some wine, sugar, dark soya sauce. and corn starch.

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Preparation is not very tough but patience is needed for the proofing the dough.The buns will have a very soft texture as a result of adequate proofing period. As for the filling, I have purposely limited the use of too many seasonings. Basically just oyster sauce and sugar. Most other ingredients can be omitted if necessary.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Serving : About 20 steamed buns depending on the size.

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Dry Ingredients (A)

  • 600 grams of bao flour or Hong Kong flour or low protein flour (水仙面粉)
  • 50 grams of corn starch or potato starch (生粉或玉米粉)
  • 100 grams of castor sugar (细砂糖)
  • Pinches of salt (盐巴)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of double acting baking powder/baking powder (双重发粉或发粉)
  • 1 packet (10-11 grams) of instant dry yeast (即时酵母)
  • 1/4 teaspoon of ammonia bicarbonate (optional) (臭粉 (可免))

Wet Ingredients (B)

  • 320 grams of lukewarm water (温水)
  • 30 grams of corn oil or cooking oil (粟米油)

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Fillings

  • 500 grams of diced barbecue pork (叉烧)
  • 1 big onion – diced (大葱)
  • 2 tablespoons of sesame oil (麻油)
  • 3 tablespoons of castor sugar (细砂糖)
  • 3 tablespoons of Chinese cooking wine (烹饪酒)
  • 5 tablespoons of oyster sauce (耗油)
  • 2 tablespoons of dark soya sauce (not in picture) (酱油)
  • About 5 tablespoons of corn starch/potato starch with 5 tablespoons of water (5勺生粉或玉米粉加5勺的水)

Others

  • Some cupcakes cups or square baking paper (water proof) for about 8 cm x 8 cm (纸杯或方形防水纸)

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Put all dry ingredients (A) in a whisking bowl. Use a spoon to stir the dry ingredients and make a well in the centre. Add in the lukewarm water and oil.  Use the same spoon to roughly stir it until it form a sticky dough. Use the machine dough hook to knead the dough for another 15-20 minutes or until the dough looks smooth and leaves the side of the whisking bowl. If the dough is too wet for the kneading, add 1-2 tablespoon of flour to continue. You can also do this manually if you don’t prefer to use the machine kneading.

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  • In a flat surface, dust with some flour, transfer the dough to the flat surface and knead for 3-5 minutes until the dough does not stick to your hand. Shape it into a ball, put it in a bowl. Cover with a wet towel or clingy wrap and let it prove for 30 minutes (or double in size) whenever is earlier. Note that this is a rather soft dough. As such, do add some plain flour or bao flour if it is too soft for you to handle. Once ready, divided the dough equally. Suggested dough size is from 30 grams to 60 grams.

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  • While the dough is proofing, get ready the ingredients for the fillings. In the frying pan, add 4 tablespoons of cooking oil, sauté the onions until fragrant. Add in the barbecue pork and stir fry until well mixed which took about 1-2 minutes. Add in the cooking wine, oyster sauce, sesame oil, sugar, oyster sauce and dark soya sauce. Stir fry for another 2 minutes. Add in the starch solution and off the heat when the starch solution turns transparent. If it is not sticky enough, add in more starches.

  • It is best to take some filling and taste if it suits your taste buds. Note that you have to be rather high handed with your seasonings because the bun skin is rather plain in taste. Once ready, set aside for later assembly.

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  • Divide the dough with your desired sizes. For standard size, it is about 30 grams of dough. However, for this illustration, I am rather uncomfortable with 30 grams and my final comfortable dough volume is about 60 grams.

  • Take a dough, shape round and flatten in a surface dusted with more plain flour or corn starch or bao flour. Put 2-3 teaspoons of filling in the centre. Seal the edges and put on a piece of cupcake cups or square baking paper. Let it proof until it is almost double in size.

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  • Once the proofing time have reached, get ready a steamer full of water. Bring to boil and steam the buns in the steamer under high heat for about 12-15 minutes. Once ready, let it sit in the steamer for 5 minutes before open the cover. Best served hot as a snack item.

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CONCLUSION

Not something very difficult to prepare. Remember to use the bao flour, a type of specially bleached flour for the white colour. Due to my big hand, my Char Siu Bao is also rather big.. ha-ha. I am sure all of you can handle much smaller dough than I am and come out with a cute, little, normal sized Char Siu Bao.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 21 March 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE .  

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If you are a Pinterest user and you are interested to have more recipes, you can join or follow this Pinterest Board set up by me  where there are more than 1800 recipes worldwide and pinned by various bloggers: FOOD BLOGGERS AND FOODIES UNITED PINTEREST BOARD. You can also join the Food Bloggers and Foodies United Group Facebook Group to see more recipes.

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Half Baked Chocolate Sponge Cake? Molten Chocolate Lava Cake (心太软)

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INTRODUCTION

This is a sinful dessert. It is a wicked indulgence.. Frankly speaking, after preparation and photo taking, I am eating the dessert in guilt knowingly what is the composition of the ingredient. However, the taste is awesome as expected, since it basically comprises of chocolate, eggs, butter and a very small amount of flour and even flour can be omitted.

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I have purposely quote a rather long paragraph from Wikipedia on this dessert as what is written is interesting and adequately explained what is required for a molten chocolate cake.

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“Molten chocolate cake or lava cake is a popular dessert that combines the elements of a flourless chocolate cake (sometimes called a chocolate decadence cake) and a soufflé. Some other names used are chocolate fondant pudding, chocolate moelleux and chocolate lava cake.

The US-based chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten claims to have invented molten chocolate cake in New York City in 1987, but the French chef and chocolatier Jacques Torres has disputed that claim, arguing that such a dish already existed in France. According to Vongerichten, he pulled a chocolate sponge cake from the oven before it was done and found that the center was still runny, but was warm and had both a good taste and a good texture. Regardless of who invented the dish, Vongerichten has been credited with popularizing it in the United States, and it is now almost a de rigueur inclusion on high-end restaurant dessert menus.

Rather than presenting only the cake itself in a ramekin or on a plate, the baker may choose to make the cake more appealing. Fresh raspberries, a drizzling of raspberry and/or chocolate sauce, and dustings of powdered sugar may be added to enhance flavor, or a sprig of mint may look more appealing as well. For a more intense chocolate taste, the baker may also add a tablespoon of strong coffee. “(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molten_chocolate_cake)

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To summarize, it is a semi cooked chocolate sponge cake of which the runny interior of chocolate batter is fantastically tasty. It is usually served in ramekins and can be decorated with fresh fruits or ice creams. It can be flourless and flour is optional with 4 main ingredients, eggs, chocolate, sugar and butter.

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Preparation of this dessert is very simple, just mixed and baked, can easily get it done with 30 minutes and good to prepare only if your guest has arrived. No complicated gadgets were required. Though simple ingredients  with simple preparation method, this is a very presentable desserts to be served. If you are hard-core chocolate addict, this is for you. I have obtain recipe from Ms. Angela Chia’s blog : Molten Lava Cake. I would like to take this opportunity to thanks her for sharing.


WHAT IS REQUIRED

Preparation: 4 small cupcake size molten lava cakes

Recipe adapted from : Molten Lava Cake 心太软熔岩蛋糕

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  • 200 grams of baking chocolates
  • 100 grams of butter
  • 20 grams of icing sugar
  • 20 grams of plain flour (optional)
  • 2 eggs

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STEPS OF PREPARATON

  • Pre-heat the oven to 180 degree Celsius.

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  • Place the butter and chocolate in a microwavable bowl. Heat for 1 minute. After 30 seconds, take it out and stir. If by the end of 1 minute and the chocolate have not yet melted, extend for another 30 second. Keep and eye and use a hand whisk to slight to whisk the chocolate butter mixture until well mixed.

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  • In a big mixing bowl, beat the egg and icing sugar until well mix. Sift in the flour, stir until well mix. Pour the chocolate mixture into the egg batter and stir until it form a sticky chocolate batter.

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  • Transfer the chocolate batter into the baking cups and bake in the pre-heated oven of 180 degree Celsius for 10-12 minutes or when the exterior of the cake is set. Dust with icing sugar if desired. Best served warm with some ice creams or fresh fruits.

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CONCLUSION

Is it as complicated as what it looks? No, it is not. It is a simple but presentable desserts. Don’t worry the fact that it is semi-cooked. Most ingredients are edible even if uncooked. But do not consume too often as it is too high calorific. Maybe you want to give it a go tonight? Once again, thank Ms. Angela Chia for her recipe.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 21 March 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE .  

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If you are a Pinterest user and you are interested to have more recipes, you can join or follow this Pinterest Board set up by me  where there are more than 1800 recipes worldwide and pinned by various bloggers: FOOD BLOGGERS AND FOODIES UNITED PINTEREST BOARD. You can also join the Food Bloggers and Foodies United Group Facebook Group to see more recipes.

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My Funny Shape Spanish You Tiao?–Churros

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INTRODUCTION

My churros have a rather funny shape as I can’t locate the correct star shape nozzle in my cabinet. What is needed is just simple nozzle as in the picture but since  I can’t locate the correct nozzle, I have used a Wilton tip 1D intended for making big swirl roses to pipe my churros.

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As a result of which, my churros are rather thin and crooked. Therefore, if you want to try the recipe, do use the correct tip as in the picture or as least as close to the picture as possible.

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Churros is a Spanish pastry deep fried snack and as per Wikipedia:

A churro, sometimes referred to as a Spanish doughnut, is a fried-dough pastry—predominantly choux—based snack. Churros are popular in Spain, France, the Philippines, Portugal, Latin America (including Brazil and Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands) and the United States. There are two types of churros in Spain, one which is thin (and sometimes knotted) and the other which is long and thick (porra). They are both normally eaten for breakfast dipped in hot chocolate or café con leche. Churros are typically fried until they become crunchy, and may be sprinkled with sugar. The surface of a churro is ridged due to having been piped from a churrera, a syringe with a star-shaped nozzle. Churros are generally prisms in shape, and may be straight, curled or spirally twisted.

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I did not search for the recipe, I get the recipe from one the members in my Facebook Group, Food blogger and Foodies United. Ms. Sue Wong had kindly share her recipe and posted in the Group’s File : CHURROS with a picture. While communicating with her, she told me that it is a rather easy to do a snack which is actually choux pastry. Looking at her pictures, I have decided to take a plunge and prepared this Spanish this afternoon.

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It is a relatively easy job actually. If you have prepared choux pastry, this is even easier. While for choux or puff pastry, it is baked but this is deep fried until crunchy. Surprising, my family members and my neighbour likes this very much and I have told them this is “Spanish Youtiao”. My neighbour starts to enquire how this is done and have shown keen interest to try preparing it. Ha-ha

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Recipe adapted from: Sue Wong’s Churros

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  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 cup of plain  flour
  • 50 grams of unsalted butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon of castor sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract/ essence
  • cooking oil for deep frying

For sprinkling on churros (not in picture)

  • 1 tablespoon of cinnamon powder
  • 3 tablespoons of castor sugar

Others

  • A piping bag with a large star tip.

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

  • Heat up a wok of oil of about 8 cm deep.

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  • In a sauce pan, place water and butter. Bring to boil. Take away the sauce pan and add in flour. Stir until well mix. Put it back to the stove and continue stirring until the dough leaves the side of the pan and forms a ball.

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  • Transfer to the whisking bowl of a stand mixer. Beat the dough for about 30 seconds. Add in one egg at a time and continue to whisk until the egg are well mixed. Repeat the same for the other 3 eggs.  Do not add the eggs too quickly, otherwise, your dough will be very runny. If it is too runny, beat for several minutes or until thickened again. The end result of the dough should be glossy but not runny.Transfer the dough to a large piping bag fitted with a star nozzle.

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  • Pipe the batter into the hot oil of your desired length. Deep fried until golden brownish in colour. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar mixture while it is hot.

  • Best served hot as a snack or breakfast item. Besides sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, another suggested way of serving is to drizzled with caramelized condensed milk (dulce de leche) or just condensed milk or chocolate sauce.

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CONCLUSON

Pardon me for these funny shape churros or Spanish you tiao. Do give it a try and I honestly believed that it will suit most Asian’s taste.

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 21 March 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE .  

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If you are a Pinterest user and you are interested to have more recipes, you can join or follow this Pinterest Board set up by me  where there are more than 1800 recipes worldwide and pinned by various bloggers: FOOD BLOGGERS AND FOODIES UNITED PINTEREST BOARD. You can also join the Food Bloggers and Foodies United Group Facebook Group to see more recipes.

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Special Compilation of Sarawakian Cuisines

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INTRODUCTION

Since I started my blog about a year ago, I have blogged quite a number of Sarawak cuisines and I will add as and when I have blogged about new Sarawak cuisines. Some of these cuisines are uniquely Sarawak cuisines. Take a look and see what are these cuisines and remember, if you travel to Sarawak, do try these cuisines locally. For those who are interested to read more about Sarawak,

“Sarawak  is one of two Malaysian states on the island of Borneo. Known as Bumi Kenyalang (“Land of the Hornbills“), Sarawak is situated on the northwest of the island, bordering the Malaysian state of Sabah to the northeast, Indonesia to the south, and surrounding Brunei. It is the largest Malaysian state. The administrative capital is Kuching, which has a population of 700,000.Major cities and towns include Miri (pop. 350,000),Sibu (pop. 257,000) and Bintulu (pop. 200,000)”. As of the last census (2010), the state population was 2,420,009.“  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarawak)

As per Sarawak Tourism’s “top 10 iconic food” in 2012 are:

  • Sarawak Laksa (included in this post)
  • Kolo Mee (included in this post)
  • Ayam Pansuh – Chicken cooked in bamboo tube
  • Midin Belacan – Jungle fern fried with shrimp paste
  • Ikan Terubok Masin – A hard to get river estuary fish
  • Umai – Shashimi alike but Sarawak version with different seasonings and condiments
  • Kompia – A traditional Foochow bread that is bagel look alike
  • Terong Dayak Soup – A special breed of yellow brinjal commonly found in Sarawak
  • Dabai – A black colour fruit that local Chinese called is olive and can be preserved to be used as side dish for porridges or rice
  • Kampua Noodle – A type of Foochow noodle which was rather similar to kolo mee as mentioned above but mostly served in plate with slightly different type of noodles and condiments.

Being in Singapore, I have difficulty to blog a lot of the cuisines from my home town due to the lack of raw material. However, the effort continues. If you are keen to learn more about Sarawak Cuisines, you can visit my humble page of Authentic Sarawak Food and History. However, I have to apologize the page had not been updated for quite a while due to time constraints. I also wanted to take this opportunity to invite interested Sarawakian readers who had a passion in Sarawak Cuisines to take over this Facebook Page.

Please click on the pictures or blue colour links to go to the respective recipes.


Noodles Dishes

Sarawak Laksa – Cooking Illustration – A unique laksa that Most Sarawakian will be proud of. You can refer to here where I have written some concise history for ICNN travel report. In this post, I have written a very detail method of preparation for this special laksa dish.

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Sarawak Laksa – Recipe – Most of the Sarawak household have cooked the laksa by using the ready pre-mix laksa paste. Being in Singapore, I have decided to try preparing my own. Overseas readers, if you are keen to prepare your own Sarawak laksa paste, you can read this post and start your own adventures.

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Sarawak Laksa – History . Why Most Sarawakian are very proud of this special laksa dish, but there is a lack of literature write up on the history and evolution of this laksa dish and why is it unique to Sarawak. If you want to go a bit further to understand the history of commercially sold Sarawak Laksa paste, you can read this short history of Sarawak Laksa paste.

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Sarawak Kolo Noodles or Dry Noodles – Sarawak Kolo noodles is rather special type of dry noodles (干捞面)that most if not all Sarawakian will be proud of. A light colour dry noodles and comfortably sits after Sarawak Laksa in the food ranking. As far as my circle of friends are concerned, none have ever rejected this noodles and Sarawakian can have this for breakfast until supper.

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Kolo Beehoon – What if you can’t the special noodles? My wife used to prepare this simplified version of kolo beehoon for our breakfast. Of course the ingredients will depends on what we have in the fridge..

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Tomato Yimin Noodles (茄汁伊面) – This noodle is rather special as it is cooked with tomato ketchup. The original noodles are deep fried noodles. In this illustration, I have used the commercially sold yimin instead. I have always called Sarawak style spaghettis and see if you concur with me.

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Meat Dishes

Motherworts Chicken (益母草姜酒鸡) This is a traditional confinement dish for ladies who just gave birth. Motherwort have been used by midwives for centuries in Europe to assist in delivery, How this special herb become a confinement dish in Sarawak remained unclear, possibly because of the influenced of British during previous colonisation of Sarawak.. Though it is a confinement dish, but it is well liked by all age groups and sexes.

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Pastry, Cakes and Snacks

Chinese Style Citrus Zested Pancake (风吹饼,风筝饼, 烘吹饼) – A rather unique type of snack in Sarawak and lots of Sarawakian Chinese love this snack. As constrasted to this illustration, it is usually round and without sesame seeds . For some Sarwakian Chinese dialect group, this is also another type of moon cake they are having.

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Sarawak Midnight Cake a cake which is full of breakfast beverages ingredients, a rich dense and dark coloured cake usually served during festivals such as Chinese New Year, Hari Raya Aidilfitri and Gawai Dayak etc. It is so dark that I have decided to call it a midnight cake and taste is awesome and rich.

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Horlicks Lapis (好力克千层蛋糕)– Sarawak is famous for it layered cake after introduction from Indonesian in late 1980’s. The lapis or layered cake are many with its special design and flavouring. This is one of the classic household lapis.

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Coffee Peppermint Lapis (咖啡薄荷千层蛋糕)– Another type of lapis for your consideration though the more common type is the chocolate peppermint lapis. This is the healthier version of lapis.

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Sarawak Style Butter Buns – The uniqueness of Sarawak style butter buns is its buttery fillings. Its filling is made from mixing the butter with some flour. Sarawakian craved for this and there are no close substitute of these buns found elsewhere. Any mystery as to why this bun is common in Sarawak but not elsewhere.

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Popiah  – Sarawak Style – Though it may be a generalization, Sarawak style popiah is generally came with dry type of fillings. Unlike West Malaysia or Singapore version, jicama were not simmer until soft. With these drier filling, popiah can be found in stalls selling kuih and other snacks. One can just pick up one and have it on its way to office.

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For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 21 March 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE .  

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If you are a Pinterest user and you are interested to have more recipes, you can join or follow this Pinterest Board set up by me  where there are more than 1800 recipes worldwide and pinned by various bloggers: FOOD BLOGGERS AND FOODIES UNITED PINTEREST BOARD. You can also join the Food Bloggers and Foodies United Group Facebook Group to see more recipes.

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Scallop On Yam Basket (扇贝芋窝)

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INTRODUCTION

This is a dish with no history and created by my humble self. I was thinking to prepare this  dish when I have guests in house.

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There is nothing to write about except the recipe since this is my own creation.

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Initially, I had wanted to prepare the classic yam ring with the yam that I have bought in the supermarket after I saw a post in a Facebook Group .  However,  when I looked at the fridge, I found one bag of big scallops given by my wife’s godmother during Chinese New Year.

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Honestly speaking, I did  not exactly know how to cook these big scallops and I believed if I cooked, the taste of the scallop should be as original as possible. Therefore, only simple cooking is required for these scallops.

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Suddenly, it crossed my mind why not I use the scallop to sit in the small yam bowl or basket. That is how I get inspired about this dish.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: Prepare 8-10 (depending on size of your yam ring)

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  • 240 grams of yam (de-skinned)
  • 1 tablespoon of cooking oil (not in picture)
  • 4 tablespoons of boiling water (not in picture)
  • 4 tablespoons of wheat starch
  • Pinches of salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon of preferred seasonings such as mushroom concentrate, MSG, sugar etc..
  • 1/2 teaspoon of five spice powder

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  • 8-10 scallops sizes of your choice.

For Korean Barbecue Sauce

  • 3 tablespoons of Teriyaki sauce or Korean Barbecue Sauce (Bibigo Sauce)*
  • 1 teaspoon of corn flour (mix with 5 teaspoons of cold water to form a corn starch solution)*
  • 1 teaspoon of dark soya sauce (optional)*

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STEPS OF PREPARATON

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  • De-skinned the yam, cut into smaller pieces and steamed in a steamer until the yam is soft. Depending on the type of yam that you purchased, for some yam, you can never get soft in certain part even after the steaming, you will have to cut it off after steaming.

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  • Once it is steamed, put the hot yam in a clean zip bag. Zip the opening and leave a bit of space in between to let the air escape. Use a rolling pin to roll or mash it until fine. You have to do this when it is hot, otherwise, it can turn hard when cold. This is my way of doing it this time. Alternatively, you can put it in a food processor and blend it until fine. Transfer out the mashed yam.

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  • Pour the hot water into the wheat starch and stir until it resemble a paste.  Pour the wheat starch, five spice powder, seasoning, salt and cooking oil onto the mashed yam. Use hand to knead it until it becomes a pliable dough…If it is too soft, just add one or two tablespoons of wheat starch or let it chilled in the fridge for 15-20 minutes.

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  • Divide the dough into your desired size. Shape it round. If it is too sticky, just dust with some wheat starch. Flatten the round ball and use a rolling pin to press on the middle and become the shape of a bowl. Deep fry in the hot oil until golden brown, drain and set aside for later use.

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  • With the same pot of hot oils, blanch the scallop for 2-3 minutes until the sides start to shrink. Note that scallops can get cooked very easily, and blanching in hot oil needs only 2-3 minutes. I was using oil blanching method this time  because since I was deep frying the yam baskets, I might as well continue to use the oil for blanching the scallop. Otherwise, you can pan fry or even oven bake the scallop. Remember that over cooked scallop will lose its juiciness and become hard or even chewy.

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  • In a small sauce pan, put 5 tablespoons of plain water. Add 2 tablespoon of Teriyaki Sauce or Korean Barbecue Sauce to the plain water. Bring to boil. Meanwhile, add 1 teaspoon of corn flour with 5 teaspoons of water to make a starch solution. Gradually pour the starch to the boiling sauce  Once the sauce boil again, off the heat and set aside.

  • For assembly, place the yam basket on the serving plate. On top of the yam bowl, place one scallop each. Drizzle with the teriyaki or Korean Barbecue sauce. Garnish with coriander leaves if desired. Best served hot as part of the Chinese set meals.

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CONCLUSION

A presentable dish for your consideration. Hope that you like the post today. Cheers.

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For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 21 March 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE .  

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If you are a Pinterest user and you are interested to have more recipes, you can join or follow this Pinterest Board set up by me  where there are more than 1800 recipes worldwide and pinned by various bloggers: FOOD BLOGGERS AND FOODIES UNITED PINTEREST BOARD. You can also join the Food Bloggers and Foodies United Group Facebook Group to see more recipes.

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Four Seasons Blog Hop #45 (10 April 2014)

Welcome to the Four Seasons Blog Hop

A party where we can celebrate the greatness that each season brings to our lives.
To be interested in the changing seasons is a happier state of mind than to be hopelessly in love with spring.
Thank you to everyone who shared their wonderful creations last week and to all of you who are joining us new this week!

So Let’s Get This Party Started!!Let's Get this Party Started Share your  food creations, gardening, clever projects, tablescapes, decorations, party themes, and inspirational knowledge … Ok, you get the point.  Join us every Thursday (opens Wednesday evening at 6:00 pm). Please stay for awhile and show some love to the guests, join us in the fun and grab a button. Four Seasons Blog Button

We will share your posts in a variety of ways on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus.  We will also have features of the week! Be sure to follow our Four Seasons Board on Pinterest!

By participating in this linky party, you agree to have your posts shared on social media and Pinterest and to receive email and Google notifications for reminders about the party. If you don’t want to receive notifications, please let us know.

Featured Bloggers

This week we are featuring two bloggers who has been long time guests at our parties. We adore their blog, their wonderful posts and we always look forward to seeing what they have been up to each week. Please stop by and check them out and say hi while you’re there. Meet Jo and Sue, “twins from a small town who love food. Eating It. Preparing It. Talking about It. Sharing it.  But, especially eating it. . . “

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How About Pan Fried Your Meat Buns? Pan Fried Buns, Shengjianbao (生煎包,生煎馒头)

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INTRODUCTION

Shenjianbao (生煎包) or pan fried bun is not new to me. I have my fair share of these lovely buns when I was stationed in Shanghai for two years.

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Even after I returned from Shanghai and when I went on business trip to Shanghai,  I always went to small lane near the hotel to enjoy these pan fried buns.

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Every store will be unique in its own unique concoction of filling ingredients. It usually come in a plate of 4 or 5 depending on the outlets, just nice for one person. It was served with red vinegar (红醋) or black vinegar (浙江黑醋)with lots of ginger strips.  It is supposed to have a rather crispy bottom and a white coloured bun skin with juicy meaty fillings. Some have it pan fried at sides and some did not.

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Per Wikipedia:

“Shengjian mantou (also known as the shengjianbao outside the Jiangnan region) is a type of small, pan-fried baozi (steamed buns) which is a specialty of Shanghai. It is usually filled with pork and gelatine that melts into soup/liquid when cooked. Shengjian mantou has been one of the most common breakfast items in Shanghai since the early 1900s. As a ubiquitous breakfast item, it has a significant place in Shanghainese culture.

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The name of the bun comes from its method of cooking. The buns are lined up in an oiled, shallow, flat pan. Typical commercial pans are more than a metre in diameter. The buns are lined up in the pan with the “knot”, where the dough is folded together, facing downwards and thus in direct contact with the oiled pan and fried into a crispy bottom during the cooking process. Water is sprayed on the buns during cooking to ensure the top (which is not in contact with the pan or the oil) is properly cooked. After frying, the bottom of the bun becomes crunchy, and the gelatine melts into soup. This combination gives the shengjian its unique flavour.  The traditional shengjian has pork fillings. Common variations include chicken, pork mixed with prawns, and pork mixed with crab meat.” (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shengjian_mantou)

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Preparation of this is actually easier than preparing the steamed buns. Some recipe do not even called for proofing but I have decided to proof it for half an hour to get a fluffier buns.  The essential ingredient of this bun is the ginger flavoured minced meat. Some recipe called for frozen pork stock (gelatine) to be added but this is not included in this recipe. If you wished, you can boil the pork ribs under medium heat until the water turn creamy. Cool the stock and freeze it in the freezer. Once set, cut the frozen pork stock into small cubes and add to the meaty fillings.

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WHAT IS REQUIRED

Servings: Prepare about 15-20 medium size buns

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Dough

Dry Ingredients (A)

  • 550 grams of pao flour (包粉) or Hong Kong flour or low protein flour (for this demonstration, I have used top flour as I have not adequate pao flour)
  • 100 grams of corn starch (玉米粉)
  • 100 grams of castor sugar (白糖)
  • Pinches of salt (not in picture) (盐巴)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder (自发面粉)
  • 10 grams of instant dry yeast (即时酵母)

Wet Ingredients (B)

  • 350 grams of lukewarm water (温水)
  • 30 grams of vegetable shortening (植物白油)(pictures show melted vegetable shortening, it is not necessary)

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  • 500 grams of minced pork (preferably pork belly)
  • 3 cm long of ginger (minced and juice extracted)
  • 1 tablespoon of sesame oil
  • Few stalks of spring onion, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon of white pepper
  • 1 tablespoon of cooking wine (not in picture)
  • 1 tablespoon of corn flour
  • 1 tablespoon of light soya sauce
  • Salt and sugar to taste
  • 1-2 tablespoons of oil
  • 200 grams of water
  • 1 tablespoon of sesame seeds

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STEPS OF PREPARATION

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  • Put all dry ingredients (A) in a whisking bowl. Use a spoon to stir the dry ingredients and make a well in the centre. Add in the lukewarm water.  Use the same spoon to roughly stir it until it form a sticky dough. Use the machine dough hook to knead the dough for 10 minutes at medium speed. Add in the vegetable shortening, beat at high speed for another 15-20 minutes or until the dough leaves the side of the whisking bowl. If the dough is too wet for the kneading, add 1-2 tablespoon of flour to continue. You can also do this manually if you don’t prefer to use the machine kneading.

  • In a flat surface, dust with some flour, transfer the dough to the flat surface and knead for 3-5 minutes until the dough does not stick to your hand. Shape it into a ball, put it in a bowl. Cover with a wet towel or clingy wrap and let it prove for 30 minutes (or double in size whenever is earlier.

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  • Meanwhile, add in all the ingredients to the minced meat, use a chopstick to stir well and let it marinate for 15 minutes or until your dough is ready. Shape the minced meat into meat balls of your size depending the size of the dough. For me, I use the ratio of 1:1, meaning 30 grams of dough wrapped against 30 grams of meat ball. But feel free to change to the size that your comfortable with.

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  • Once the dough is ready, divide it into the equal number of dough as the meat balls. My dough weigh about 50 grams each. Flatten one ball and put a meatball. Seal the end of the dough.

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  • In a flat frying pan, heat some cooking oil under medium heat. Put in the meat buns and pan fry until the bottom turn golden brown. Once it turn golden brown, add some water and close the lid. The amount of the water to be added will be about 1/3 of the height of the buns. After 2 minutes, open the lid, sprinkle some sesame seeds (if desired) and let it cooked until the water dries up. Once dries up, the buns is considered as cooked. Best served hot with Chinese black or red vinegar with chopped ginger.

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CONCLUSION

I shouldn’t have pan fried the side of the buns as these make my buns looks rather dirty. In addition, pardon me for the poor shaping skills. However, I am sure you can shape better than I do..

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Hope you like the post today. Cheers and have a nice day.

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For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 21 March 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE .  

 

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GUAI SHU SHU | Guai Shu Shu is a “shu shu” that is “guai”….


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15 Local Singapore And Malaysian Kuih and Snack Special Compilation

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INTRODUCTION

This is a special compilation for mostly Singaporean and Malaysian hawker centre’s cakes (kuih) and snacks. Most of the local Singaporean and Malaysian have take for granted this kuih’s and snacks as it is easily available at reasonable price in the hawker centres, road side stalls or coffee shops. However, for overseas readers, they have missed the snack and will try to replicate based on whatever local cooking ingredients that they have. The list will continue to be added as I have vowed to have more Asian snacks and Kuih recipe’s in the future.

Click on the blue colour link to the respective recipes.


Steamed Chicken Sticky Rice (Lo Mai Gai)  (糯米鸡)

Oyster omelette (耗煎,耗蛋)

Chwee Kueh (水粿)

Radish/Turnip/Carrot/Daikon Cake (腊味萝卜糕)

Nonya Steamed Layered Cake (九层糕)Kueh Lapis 

Kueh Salat/Kueh Seri Muka (椰香糯米蒸糕)

Kueh Ketayap/Kueh Dadar Gulong (香兰椰丝卷)

Pulut Panggang ( 糯米虾米卷)

Epok-epok (Money Bag Curry Puffs) (咖喱卜)

Murtabak Manis or Apam Balik (面煎饼)

Steamed Yam and Pumpkin Cake (芋头金瓜糕)

Steamed Tapioca Cake Or Kuih Ubi Kayu (木薯蒸糕)

Hainanese Coconut Kuih or E Bua or Yi Ba (海南薏粑粿)

Alum Free Youtiao (无臭粉油条)

Ma La Gao/Ma Lai Gao (马来糕)

 


For more recipes, you can refer to my RECIPE INDEX (updated as at 21 March 2014)  here and you can follow me at PINTEREST or visit this blog’s FACEBOOK PAGE .  

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If you are a Pinterest user and you are interested to have more recipes, you can join or follow this Pinterest Board set up by me  where there are more than 1800 recipes worldwide and pinned by various bloggers: FOOD BLOGGERS AND FOODIES UNITED PINTEREST BOARD. You can also join the Food Bloggers and Foodies United Group Facebook Group to see more recipes.

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